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Budget Approved. Now what?

Written by:  Matt Dionne, Managing Partner TYGES Elite

budgetThis is the time of the year when most business leaders have their budgets approved and are now reviewing last month’s progress toward their new annual goals. Many leaders will learn that the actual results are not achieving the year-to-date goals after just one or two months. “How can this be?” you might ask.

“How can we be off target so early in the year that has just begun.”

This can be due to a number of reasons including:

  • Poor Assumptions
  • Changes in Market Conditions
  • Unplanned Negative Events
  • Lack of Resources
  • Errors in budget modeling like linear budgeting without seasonal effects

However, sometimes budgeted results are missed due to ineffective actions which result from poor implementation and poor execution.

In my past, I have seen many business plans that were well designed with great actions. However, the execution of those actions did not deliver the expected results. Often this was due to the lack of initiative, foresight, planning, urgency or skill set from those responsible for the actions.  As leaders, we focus on the why, what, when, and how much to spend on the planned actions.  invest5However, we do not spend enough time on who will be doing the actions and do they have the leadership, experience, and skill set for the planned actions.

Improving results dependent on people requires an investment in people.

Such investments include reassigning your best employees to new roles, providing training to those in the roles, or acquiring the required talent to drive the new actions.  Having the leadership talent to achieve planned improvements is something equally important to the actions themselves and deserves more time and planning.

So, as you review your business results to your budgeted plans, ask yourself if you have the leadership talent to achieve your planned success. If not, it’s time to take action on WHO will be driving your business actions.

I encourage your feedback and would enjoy the opportunity to provide you the resources for a top tier performing team.  You can find me on LinkedIn and you can learn more about my team and company here.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES by following us on Twitter @TYGESInt or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Where have all the candidates gone?

Written by:  Katrina Blalock, VPGM of Aerospace & Defense Practice

Throughout my recruiting years, I’ve noticed that qualified and interested candidates are becoming harder and harder to find. I’ve often wondered,

“Are employers being too picky or not paying enough for talent?”

Purple Squirrel is a term used in the recruiting industry to describe the type of candidate that is a rare find. purple-squirrelToo often, employers will present recruiters with a wish list of educational, work history and skill-sets that radically limit the candidate pool. Employers should be mindful that each condition placed upon a job description exponentially shrinks the candidate pool. In developing job criteria, employers should be mindful that they are excluding good candidates based on pinpoints of a job requisition.

After finding the right candidate, are employers paying competitive market value?

In high school physics, we learned the Law of Inertia (i.e. objects at rest tend to stay at rest unless acted upon by a force). Candidates are similar as inertia to change jobs or companies does not exist. Over time, prospective employers have forgotten this universal principle when offering a compensation package to a candidate. no-thanksSimply put, qualified candidates will rarely change jobs for the same money they are making at their present employment. Employers, it’s time to “come off of the hip” and make it worthwhile for the “Purple Squirrel” to leave his or her job and come work for you.

Unnecessary job criteria and average compensation packages have created the illusion of a candidate shortage. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Where have all of the candidates gone?  They may be right under your nose!  

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Are You Having Fun?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Manufacturing Practice

Are you having fun?

I was thinking about work and how sometimes it’s tough to get motivated and other times it’s really easy. I have noticed that I have fun at work when my customers are happy about our service and vice versa. Here’s the thing: life is too short to work with jerks or people you don’t connect well with. One of my clients told me recently that she wants her people to have fun at work because they spend so much time there. I like that mentality a lot.

serviceI hope you are having fun working and, when you work with TYGES, it is something you look back on as a positive experience. If it is not positive, then let us know. And, if it is positive, then let us know that too.

I received this note a while back in an email from one of our candidates,

“I have worked with a few recruiters and must say that my experience with you and TYGES has been the best.”

Similar to the above I received this note recently from a candidate that we have in process,

“I am impressed with your preparation assistance.”

That’s fun to me.  I like the service aspect of what I do and it is a motivator for me.

Frankly, it is amazing to me how poorly many recruiters treat their candidates. I just do not understand it. At TYGES, our process is built around making sure that the customer experience is positive, both on the candidate and the client side. respectAs Recruiters, we have to set the tone with the client and the candidate for the relationship and it is in our nature to be impatient for results and answers, but we still need to treat people as we would want to be treated if the roles were reversed.

It’s always a good idea to reflect on your work and “why you work” from time to time. If you’re not having fun at work then maybe it’s time for a change. If you decide that a change is needed or you just want to explore options then call us. Send us your info or check out our list of job openings. I can’t promise we will be able to find you a new career opportunity but I can promise we will try to make the process a positive one.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Problem With Integrity

Written by:  Ted Fletcher, Account Executive

While the author is unknown to me, you may have heard the saying “Tell a lie ONCE and all your truths become questionable.” LieEveryone has worked in environments where integrity is not highly prized in word AND deed. You may feel contaminated or complicit simply because of guilt by association. Lack of integrity is slimy and casts its practitioners in a very poor light. The problem is that integrity is inconvenient. You may not close the deal, sell the product, win the election, because of that meddlesome nine-letter word. But you’ll also feel cleaner and build a good reputation which “is worth more than fine gold.” Integrity is freeing.

The natural inclination for a person or business is to take the easier route and not operate with integrity. But honesty and integrity are intentional, akin to strengthening a muscle through exercise. It won’t get stronger if not utilized.

I work in the world of recruiting, an industry sometimes characterized by less-than-above-board practices (here’s a plug for TYGES International…if you’re in the world of Industrial Manufacturing, TYGES is a search firm you should really consider working with for many reasons, one of which is our values).

easy routeWhoever you are, you (we) will undoubtedly approach a fork in your road today and will have to make a split-second decision to either act with integrity…or not. And when we DO take the easy route, hopefully we’ll taste the bitterness and determine to take the road less traveled next time.

Integrity is by all accounts a GOOD thing. Lack of integrity is a BAD thing. I want to do business with people whom I can trust, and so do you. So, whatever our context, occupation, etc., let’s have an excellent day and take the road less traveled.

I encourage your feedback and would enjoy being a “Career Coach” for you.  You can learn more about me HERE, also you can follow me on LinkedIn and/or on Twitter as I focus on helping make good things happen to other people. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Trifecta – Make yourself more attractive to Hiring Managers

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

Recruiters spend a lot of time working to find that perfect person who fits a very narrow set of criteria and has the intangibles that make them a good fit with the client. I’m constantly evaluating people based on their work experience, industry experience, location preferences and a host of other things that may or may not be evident by a simple resume perusal.

I remember seeing this chart in a presentation a while back and I even drew a little picture of it in my notebook that I have hanging on the wall in my office.  Many times when I am debating whether someone’s level of fit to a particular position I find myself using this criteria as a guide. I call it The Trifecta.

The Trifecta is a Venn Diagram that describes, in very simple terms, the level of fit that a particular person may or may not possess when it comes to a position I am recruiting.

Let me break it down for you.

There are 3 circles here that each represent some attributes for the particular candidate or job. Skills, Geography & Industry.

  • Skills represent the required experience or skillset that this person must have to be qualified for the role. This might be Education, Experiential or even Knowledge based skills. An example might be someone who has led a lean transformation from the corporate level.
  • Geography is pretty straightforward. It essentially means that the person or job where the role is located is a good fit. Ideally this would be local and within commuting distance but it could also be in a place that is highly desirable for some reason. Maybe it is a virtual role.
  • The final circle is Industry. In the ideal situation the individual or position fits well with the industry background.

Now comes the scoring part of the diagram. As you can see, there are numbers 1, 2, and 3 on the chart.

  • 3 represents a fit for both skills & geography but not industry. This is the least desirable situation as the person might be a good fit based on experience and they are in the right place but they lack experience in that industry. We can’t change this because the person either has it or they don’t.
  • 2 represents a fit for both skills and industry. This is better than 3 because we can do something to change this.  Ex – We can relocate the individual to the location where the job needs them to be.
  • 1 is The Trifecta. The individual has the skills, industry experience and is located in the right geography. This is what we are looking for in the perfect world.

What does this mean for you as a Job Seeker or Hiring Authority?

As a Job Seeker, try to find positions where you meet The Trifecta. This means that you are local, meet the skills requirements and also have experience in the industry. In the popular vernacular this is a “no brainer” for the person who receives your resume. You’ll get an interview, which is what you are after.

As a Hiring Authority, this means that you are screening for skills, industry & geography as you scan resumes and talk with potential candidates. Clearly those who bring The Trifecta are your ideal fit and you can focus on confirming that the cultural fit is there in the interview process.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Pursuit of Greatness

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Operations

Greatness is something that calls out to most of us, to a certain level, everyday. To define it and or give you 5 quick steps to obtain it would simply degrade what Greatness is all about. First, let me say…

Greatness is not an accident or a destination.

Let’s look at it this way, what I would call the 3 Levels of Greatness:

The First Level of Greatness has been experienced by all of us. clemson-2It is very crowded at this level with family, friends, co-workers, etc. Simply reliving greatness as we retell stories, read an article/book, watch a movie, or enjoy a TV show that has captured greatness at one point in our history.

The Second Level of Greatness has not been experienced by all of us; yet, more than likely, most of us. At this level we observe greatness first hand.
clemsonThings like hearing a life changing speech, watching an inspiring athletic performance, absorbing a mind blowing musical performance, witnessing incredible acts of heroism first-hand, or observing something that is simply miraculous. Like the First Level, it is pretty crowded here as well.  Unfortunately, most of us get stuck at this level.

The Third Level of Greatness is open to anyone, just like the first two levels; yet, only a few will ever make it here. If you are really fortunate, you will do what you are already capable of doing…you will achieve greatness, not observe or hear a story of; yet, achieve or taste greatness.  Greatness is simply a state of mind that you will not accept anything other than achieving your best…what you were created to do.

What happens when you achieve greatness?

  1. Your self-less act, display of courage, or achievement of uncharted excellence will be retold. (Level One of Greatness)
  2. Your self-less act, display of courage, or achievement of uncharted excellence will be observed by others. (Level Two of Greatness)

Greatness will always be observed, greatness will always be retold, & greatness will always inspire and attract others.

So why are we all inspired and/or attracted to greatness? Simple, that’s what you were created to obtain. It’s the quest we are all on; however, it’s easier just to observe and/or retell vs. to actually do. Most people just get comfortable with their surroundings, peer pressures, and typically succumb to mediocrity. mediocrityPerhaps you are thinking, my “mediocrity” is pretty good. I do not know what greatness looks like for you, to be completely clear, no one else does either. If you are honest with yourself, you already know what it is that you have been created to accomplish…the greatness has always been inside you, simply waiting to be unleashed.

Here are three things that will happen when you are on the right track to greatness:

  1. You will be transformed prior to tasting/achieving greatness. In other words, nothing is going to change if you remain the same.
  2. Your current social circles of family, friends, and co-workers will become smaller. Be prepared, you might even feel like you are by yourself for a while. Have no worries, as this is a short season. Like minded, driven persons will emerge and/or someone from your original social circles will be transformed to support or join you. Simply put, your environment will change for the better.
  3. Most important, greatness will impact and/or inspire others in a positive way, creating a continued domino effect of inspiration all around you.

I encourage you to do one thing different today, just take one stepgreatness3…one step that will inspire those around you. We both know that there will be more than one step to take on your quest for greatness. But by taking just one step, you will be closer to your greatness and that will fan the flame that is already inside of you. Good luck and be true to yourself, the person you were created to be.  Best of luck to you and your family in 2017!

I encourage your feedback as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives.   Let’s stay in touch and connect  on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare  Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Integrated Talent Chain – Part II

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO TYGES International

As I continue to talk to companies/clients and walk with them in their recruiting process, it is quite clear that there is a lack of an Integrated Talent Chain. Right now, I can’t tell if it is ignorance or just not a priority. I tend to think it’s a combination of both as while companies profess that people are their most valuable asset, that is not reflective in any part of the chain of events associated with recruitment, hiring, on-boarding, and retention of Talent. human capitalYes they put up fancy words like “Human Capital” and have their websites saying all the right things but the reality it is all surface with no depth.
Last month I wrote Integrated Talent Chain – Does it Exist?  Now I would like to take a deeper dive into ITC (Integrated Talent Chain), by answering the following:

• Understanding the current inventory of Talent in your organization?
• Understanding the forecasted needs in the next few years?
• Understanding the turnover (voluntary / involuntary)?

Translated in manufacturing speak:

• Current Inventory
• Sales Forecast
• Scrap

Companies pour so much energy in to most of their processes (purchasing, facilities, product development, marketing, manufacturing, etc.) and they spend a small fraction of their time understanding and planning their Human Capital. Yes companies do a decent job of managing headcounts that are used to produce products (direct labor) but where they normally fall down is measuring those on the indirect side. As we survey companies, most of the indirect side people management is reactive at best.

My question is why is this treated like “black magic” versus truly understanding your needs and filling your needs with the appropriate people?

An ITC that is tied to the business plan will give you what your needs are all the way down to a job description with responsibilities and expectations that you can hold the individual accountable. So back to the question – why is this not more methodical and calculable versus reactive? My supposition is companies don’t take it serious and still believe that they can recruit/hire whoever they want and whenever they want. I also think that most companies see this as an HR function primarily which is completely wrong. This should be in the top 3 priorities of the CEO and he/she needs to own it – period – no excuses. Top Down

Stop delegating ITC to everyone else in the company – own it, walk it, lead it. Yes you will need the help of your team but unless you own it, it will never be fully realized.
Where to start? Why not start with the basics

1. Take an inventory of your team (bottom to top); rate them – yes that means you have to make some subjective calls but anything is better than what you have now.
2. Look at your Business Plan over the next 3 years. Walk it down in the organization to understand the impact of the growth/decline planned for the business. Take this to the individual role level. Be Intentional.
3. Determine what your turnover is (guess if you have too initially).

With these 3 components you can create a mathematical model that will identify your gaps; Once you have this current state completed, you will need to maintain it like your checkbook – regularly. ITCNow you can begin to proactively shift your ITC on the recruiting side and figure out how to develop your existing staff to either coach them in or coach them out. Sounds easy right? No – because it is a painful exercise initially to set up but also to maintain and revisit monthly. If your too big to do it all at once, focus on the top 2 or 3 levels and get the process down and then add another level down every few months until you have full coverage. Along the way, there will be naysayers that don’t see the importance of the ITC but stick to it.

This is not “sexy”. You are not taking a cool new product to market; developing a new product or installing a new manufacturing line but this is the lifeline that will either grow your company or kill your company.

I welcome your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Recruiting – Don’t Believe the Hype

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Operations

In the world of recruiting, there are a few basic category types of search.  I see articles written all the time trying to “credit” or “discredit” a certain category of search based simply upon the “category” of search.

My caution to you is, don’t believe all the hype.

For the purposes of this short article, there are three basic categories of search in the recruiting world:

  1. Contingent – the search firm will only collect a fee if they find and place a suitable candidate for the position in question
  2. Engaged – the search firm will get an upfront fee (15-35% of the total fee) when they begin the search, with the remainder due upon the placement of the suitable candidate for the position in question
  3. Retained – the search firm will typically get paid in 3 payments: 1/3 to start the search, 1/3 when the qualified candidates are presented, and the final 1/3 due upon the start date of the hired candidate; plus, any expenses incurred during the search.pick me

Most recruiting firms specialize in one “category” of search, hence the reason for all the hype.  A “Pick Me” attitude because of a “category” of search that they specialize in, listing all of the pros (in their opinion) of a certain category.  Important things like:  Quality, Speed, Specialized Niche, Trust, Confidential Processes, Relational, Established Networks, Etc.

However, most companies do not have a one size fits all approach to their business.  In most cases, they need a partner that is flexible to their needs and not confined to the limits (if they exist) to a certain category and/or a certain price point that the search firm is comfortable within.

car sinking2Let’s look at it this way…one could believe that a car is the best “category” for transportation (especially if they sell cars).  However, I guess the best form of transportation would depend upon where you want to go.

Companies do not need to be placed within or limited by a “category” or restricted by anything.

Companies need a partner that asks the right questions and then design’s flexible solution(s) that are in the best interest of the company.  No hype, just real long-term solutions.  Sometimes you’ll need a car, others a boat, or perhaps a _____.

So again, be careful…don’t believe all the hype.  In the world of recruiting, the “category” of search really means very little.  The important things to consider are the quality/process/metrics of the person, team, and/or the search firms credentials and performance as they relate to your niche within your industry.

What if there were a partner that could handle your company’s needs from the top professionals on your factory floor to the C-Suite and Board of Directors? One Solution, the same team?

For 14 years, TYGES International continues to perfect the art of search.  Offering retained, engaged, and contingent categories of executive search.  With a 1,000+ successful placements in the Manufacturing and Healthcare industries, our belief is not to put you in a box or a category; yet, strive everyday, with our team of 20+ recruiters,  to perfect our customer’s experience by offering the same proven processes and industry leading performance metrics related to quality and speed…regardless of the category that makes the most sense for your specific search.  Your best solution, not ours.  We are not resume machine guns, TYGES and TYGES Elite have been built on quality as we know the space we search within.  More than know, we have quite literally been “in the shoes” of the folks we are seeking to find for our clients, as our team is made up of former industry professionals.

Perhaps TYGES is a fit for your company?  Perhaps not?  Either way, I hope that you find the flexible solution that makes your company the most productive and successful within your market’s niche.

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at http://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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