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Where have all the candidates gone?

Written by:  Katrina Blalock, VPGM of Aerospace & Defense Practice

Throughout my recruiting years, I’ve noticed that qualified and interested candidates are becoming harder and harder to find. I’ve often wondered,

“Are employers being too picky or not paying enough for talent?”

Purple Squirrel is a term used in the recruiting industry to describe the type of candidate that is a rare find. purple-squirrelToo often, employers will present recruiters with a wish list of educational, work history and skill-sets that radically limit the candidate pool. Employers should be mindful that each condition placed upon a job description exponentially shrinks the candidate pool. In developing job criteria, employers should be mindful that they are excluding good candidates based on pinpoints of a job requisition.

After finding the right candidate, are employers paying competitive market value?

In high school physics, we learned the Law of Inertia (i.e. objects at rest tend to stay at rest unless acted upon by a force). Candidates are similar as inertia to change jobs or companies does not exist. Over time, prospective employers have forgotten this universal principle when offering a compensation package to a candidate. no-thanksSimply put, qualified candidates will rarely change jobs for the same money they are making at their present employment. Employers, it’s time to “come off of the hip” and make it worthwhile for the “Purple Squirrel” to leave his or her job and come work for you.

Unnecessary job criteria and average compensation packages have created the illusion of a candidate shortage. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Where have all of the candidates gone?  They may be right under your nose!  

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Key to Avoiding Talent Problems

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

As we begin 2017, I find myself having numerous conversations with clients regarding their talent problems. talent6We did a five part series last year on this subject, here they are Part I, II, III, IV, & V.

Today, I want to focus on a pretty amazing company that understands talent and it has shown up in their financial results year over year for the past couple of decades – Danaher. For the average person, they won’t recognize the Danaher name. It is a publicly traded holding company with a number of different brands/products throughout its portfolio that grew from a small $700 million company in the 90’s to nearly $20 billion in recent years using their “secret sauce” – the DBS (Danaher Business System) which is modeled after the Toyota Production System (TPS) but with many enhancements in my opinion. Last year they split the company in to two companies (Danaher & Fortive) to help focus them in particular areas. Regardless of the split, they will continue forward with the DBS model and it will show up in their performance.

Many articles have been written about Danaher so my intent is not to replicate them but rather I want to focus on what I see as one of their key ingredients to the DBS success – how they handle talent. While this is not the end all be all, this is where I see they have a distinct edge over their peer group of companies as well as the many companies out there trying to emulate/duplicate their DBS model and ultimately their success. Here’s what I’ve seen:

They have a farm system (think baseball) where they consistently hire new college graduates (undergrads and their coveted new MBA graduate program where they recruit from the top 10 programs in the US). talent4Regardless of what’s happening with their market / businesses they’re committed to hiring the brightest & the best and they tend to pay them to the right of the bell curve – meaning they pay well. For the high potential MBA’s, they put them in a rotation program where they garner experience in commercial roles, operational roles, and strategy roles ultimately letting the “cream of the crop” rise to the top and become their GM’s/Presidents.

The key here is they are not necessarily filling open requisitions that were created by someone who left the organization.

They in fact are over hiring to keep building their “bench strength.” Very few companies do this as consistently or well as Danaher. Most companies try to run lean and wait for someone to resign. This is a huge mistake in my opinion because whether you move a person internally or make an external hire there is so much opportunity cost being left on the table due to lost leadership and productivity. This is something that most presidents don’t truly grasp. They get it conceptually but do nothing to build their bench strength. I equate it to orders are flowing in from your customers and you are out of stock – lost opportunity. Something you never get back.

What’s amazing to me is this is all a math equation. Companies have an idea of their turnover % each year, they know the ages of their employees, and they have a projection of the headcount they will need to complete the goals for the year. talent3They can also pretty easily figure out the trends for what types of roles are turning over and build bench around these specific roles. I can tell you the patterns of my clients and I don’t have all their data.

So why am I sharing this today?

To get you to think of talent as a real investment – not a short range transaction. Consider putting together a Sales Operation Planning process around talent and get serious and intentional about finally getting ahead of the game in your talent pipeline. If you have not figured it out, this is only going to get worse for everyone as company tenures are shrinking, loyalty to companies is all but gone, and people are getting recruited out for bigger jobs, bigger titles, and bigger money. If your average turnover was 5% last year, expect it to rise. If you choose to do nothing, expect tough times in the future as you won’t have the talent you need when you need it. It’s time for leaders to step up and do something about talent instead of blaming others. This is a leadership problem to solve.

I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion.   You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Clarity & the New England Patriots – what do they have in common?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Let me start this conversation by saying I’m not a Patriots fan. In fact, they are considered the enemy to my lowly Miami Dolphins who have brought nothing but disappointment for two decades running. While the Patriots may be the enemy I have an enormous amount of respect for the leadership and their process. patriots5Yes, they’ve been criticized over the years for filming others practices, deflating footballs, etc. but the reality is their leadership has built a culture of excellence for two decades running. I remember when Drew Bledsoe went down in the second game in 2001 with an injury. My first thought was ouch – my second thought was we may have a shot with Bledsoe gone because they are putting in this unknown quarterback drafted in the 6th round from Michigan named Tom Brady. Even after starting the year 0-2, this no-name steps up and carries them to the Super Bowl Championship and the end of the Drew Bledsoe era.

Earlier this year, Brady was suspended for the first four games of the regular season, up steps the #2 quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo (who?) and they win their first two games. He gets injured in game two and up steps the #3 quarterback Jacoby Brissett (who?) and they go 1 – 1 with him. Tom Brady comes back in game 5 and wins. Now they are 5-1 and arguably one of the strongest teams in the NFL.

So what is it they have that allows them to keep performing at a high level regardless of injuries, distractions (think Aaron Hernandez), etc.? 

The conversation above is centered around quarterbacks but reality is they’ve had injuries and distractions across the board but for some reason they keep winning. The Pats have 124 wins over the past decade (#1 in the NFL and 20 more than the second team – Indianapolis). It starts with Leadership – Robert Kraft at the helm of the Patriots and his head coach Bill Belichick who joined the Pats in 2000. patriots3These two gentlemen are the clear leaders (not the players). They have established a culture of team first and have put a system in place where average players perform way above their individual capability. Tom Brady is a great quarterback because he plays within the New England Patriots system. Could he play elsewhere? Yes he could but the question is whether he would be as effective. I highly doubt it.

So what is it they have? 1) Clear leadership – Kraft & Belichick 2) Clear Systems & Processes 3) Clear Culture – you join the patriots they don’t join you 4) Clear role definition – everyone has a role to play. Yes they have talent but it’s the talent that fits their culture & their schemes – not the other way around. Corporations talk about talent like it’s the magic recipe to fixing everything. patriots4It doesn’t hurt to have talent on the team but without Clarity of Leadership, Systems, Processes, Culture, & Role Definition, it is pretty hard to be win as a team.

I’d appreciate your thoughts even if you don’t like football.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Trifecta – Make yourself more attractive to Hiring Managers

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

Recruiters spend a lot of time working to find that perfect person who fits a very narrow set of criteria and has the intangibles that make them a good fit with the client. I’m constantly evaluating people based on their work experience, industry experience, location preferences and a host of other things that may or may not be evident by a simple resume perusal.

I remember seeing this chart in a presentation a while back and I even drew a little picture of it in my notebook that I have hanging on the wall in my office.  Many times when I am debating whether someone’s level of fit to a particular position I find myself using this criteria as a guide. I call it The Trifecta.

The Trifecta is a Venn Diagram that describes, in very simple terms, the level of fit that a particular person may or may not possess when it comes to a position I am recruiting.

Let me break it down for you.

There are 3 circles here that each represent some attributes for the particular candidate or job. Skills, Geography & Industry.

  • Skills represent the required experience or skillset that this person must have to be qualified for the role. This might be Education, Experiential or even Knowledge based skills. An example might be someone who has led a lean transformation from the corporate level.
  • Geography is pretty straightforward. It essentially means that the person or job where the role is located is a good fit. Ideally this would be local and within commuting distance but it could also be in a place that is highly desirable for some reason. Maybe it is a virtual role.
  • The final circle is Industry. In the ideal situation the individual or position fits well with the industry background.

Now comes the scoring part of the diagram. As you can see, there are numbers 1, 2, and 3 on the chart.

  • 3 represents a fit for both skills & geography but not industry. This is the least desirable situation as the person might be a good fit based on experience and they are in the right place but they lack experience in that industry. We can’t change this because the person either has it or they don’t.
  • 2 represents a fit for both skills and industry. This is better than 3 because we can do something to change this.  Ex – We can relocate the individual to the location where the job needs them to be.
  • 1 is The Trifecta. The individual has the skills, industry experience and is located in the right geography. This is what we are looking for in the perfect world.

What does this mean for you as a Job Seeker or Hiring Authority?

As a Job Seeker, try to find positions where you meet The Trifecta. This means that you are local, meet the skills requirements and also have experience in the industry. In the popular vernacular this is a “no brainer” for the person who receives your resume. You’ll get an interview, which is what you are after.

As a Hiring Authority, this means that you are screening for skills, industry & geography as you scan resumes and talk with potential candidates. Clearly those who bring The Trifecta are your ideal fit and you can focus on confirming that the cultural fit is there in the interview process.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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8 Ways to Help a Recruiter Find a New Role for You

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

I often talk to candidates who have worked diligently to find a new role but have failed time and time again to find something suitable. Often, they have interviewed several times only to come in second. It amazes me that these same candidates expect a recruiter to able to wave his or her magic wand and get them in front of a dozen great companies who are hiring. choices3Let me be honest with you: I do not have a magic wand and I do not know any recruiter who has one either. I do know that finding a new role is tough and is made even more so by those who will not help themselves.

Having said this, I have some ideas for those who work with recruiters that will maximize the value you receive from that relationship.

  1. Treat the recruiter like the valuable resource they are. Be honest and open with them about what you want to do and where you want to go. Help them form a clear picture of what you want.
  2. Time kills all deals. Never waste the recruiter’s time by professing to have interest in a role when you really don’t. Make sure you do your due diligence and then pursue the role with all of your energy.
  3. No surprises. Be open with them about everything. This includes the good, the bad, and the ugly. Don’t set the recruiter up to fail by withholding information about why you left your previous job, etc.
  4. Follow the recruiter’s advice in all things related to the job search. Remember, this person makes a living finding people like you a job. When the recruiter tells you not to discuss something with the hiring authority, then don’t. If you are unclear on what you should or should not discuss, then ask.
  5. Get organized. Know what companies have been given your credentials in the past. Don’t set the recruiter up to give a company a resume that is already on file.
  6. Prep. Prep. Prep. When you go into an interview, you should know everything publicly available about the company and the role. Who are the decision makers? What are they looking for in a candidate? Why have others done poorly in interviews? Get all the information you can from the recruiter about these things so that you can prepare for them.
  7. Process is key. If you are unclear about the recruiter’s process or the company’s hiring process, then ask for clarification. Make sure you do what you say you are going to do when you said you would do it.
  8. Check in on a regular basis. Even if have not heard from the recruiter, you can certainly call or email once every week or so with an update. Nothing keeps your name on someone’s lips like regular communication.

So that’s it.

Help us to help you.

A recruiter can get you into an interview, but it’s up to you to get the call back by showing them what you’re made of when the time comes.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Integrated Talent Chain – Part II

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO TYGES International

As I continue to talk to companies/clients and walk with them in their recruiting process, it is quite clear that there is a lack of an Integrated Talent Chain. Right now, I can’t tell if it is ignorance or just not a priority. I tend to think it’s a combination of both as while companies profess that people are their most valuable asset, that is not reflective in any part of the chain of events associated with recruitment, hiring, on-boarding, and retention of Talent. human capitalYes they put up fancy words like “Human Capital” and have their websites saying all the right things but the reality it is all surface with no depth.
Last month I wrote Integrated Talent Chain – Does it Exist?  Now I would like to take a deeper dive into ITC (Integrated Talent Chain), by answering the following:

• Understanding the current inventory of Talent in your organization?
• Understanding the forecasted needs in the next few years?
• Understanding the turnover (voluntary / involuntary)?

Translated in manufacturing speak:

• Current Inventory
• Sales Forecast
• Scrap

Companies pour so much energy in to most of their processes (purchasing, facilities, product development, marketing, manufacturing, etc.) and they spend a small fraction of their time understanding and planning their Human Capital. Yes companies do a decent job of managing headcounts that are used to produce products (direct labor) but where they normally fall down is measuring those on the indirect side. As we survey companies, most of the indirect side people management is reactive at best.

My question is why is this treated like “black magic” versus truly understanding your needs and filling your needs with the appropriate people?

An ITC that is tied to the business plan will give you what your needs are all the way down to a job description with responsibilities and expectations that you can hold the individual accountable. So back to the question – why is this not more methodical and calculable versus reactive? My supposition is companies don’t take it serious and still believe that they can recruit/hire whoever they want and whenever they want. I also think that most companies see this as an HR function primarily which is completely wrong. This should be in the top 3 priorities of the CEO and he/she needs to own it – period – no excuses. Top Down

Stop delegating ITC to everyone else in the company – own it, walk it, lead it. Yes you will need the help of your team but unless you own it, it will never be fully realized.
Where to start? Why not start with the basics

1. Take an inventory of your team (bottom to top); rate them – yes that means you have to make some subjective calls but anything is better than what you have now.
2. Look at your Business Plan over the next 3 years. Walk it down in the organization to understand the impact of the growth/decline planned for the business. Take this to the individual role level. Be Intentional.
3. Determine what your turnover is (guess if you have too initially).

With these 3 components you can create a mathematical model that will identify your gaps; Once you have this current state completed, you will need to maintain it like your checkbook – regularly. ITCNow you can begin to proactively shift your ITC on the recruiting side and figure out how to develop your existing staff to either coach them in or coach them out. Sounds easy right? No – because it is a painful exercise initially to set up but also to maintain and revisit monthly. If your too big to do it all at once, focus on the top 2 or 3 levels and get the process down and then add another level down every few months until you have full coverage. Along the way, there will be naysayers that don’t see the importance of the ITC but stick to it.

This is not “sexy”. You are not taking a cool new product to market; developing a new product or installing a new manufacturing line but this is the lifeline that will either grow your company or kill your company.

I welcome your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Are You Living Your Destiny?

Written by:  Charlotte Harmon, Executive Recruiter

As we’ve entered Q2 of 2016, many New Year’s resolutions are simply memories by this time. The goals written down are still there on that piece of paper on the corner of the desk … but have we made any progress towards achieving them?  For all of us, life happens and can dim our enthusiasm or simply knock us down … taking us off the focus of our goals!

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Are you looking for…

A Rewarding Career with:

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  • Unlimited Earning Potential
  • Advancement
  • Work-Life Balance
  • Benefits
  • Professional Training
  • Growth Oriented Performance Company
  • Base + Commission

 

If you are a driven professional looking for unlimited earning potential, upward mobility, and work-life balance (No Weekends, No Evenings, & No Travel)…then TYGES could be the company for you.

TYGES International is currently accepting applications for our growing team with a potential start date during the month of June 2016.  If you have a driven & professional personality, strong time management skills, computer fluency, a 4 Year Degree, knowledge of Sales, Industrial, Manufacturing, and/or the Healthcare Industries, a strong desire to learn, and an undeniable passion to help others…then we look forward to hearing from you.

Click Here to get started.

You can learn more about TYGES on their website www.tyges.com and stay connected with the latest industry news and resources through TYGES International’s LinkedIn group page, on Twitter, and here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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What criteria do you use to judge when it is time to change jobs?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Division

How do you know when it is time to start a new job search? I often talk with people whochange8 are unsure if now is the right time for a change and they often miss out on good opportunities. Only you can judge if now is the right time and it costs nothing except time to look at a new opportunity. I can tell you that, as a recruiter, I only want someone to change jobs if it is truly a better situation for them and their family.

Clearly, a job change is a personal decision.

To help with that decision, here are some criteria that I think would be helpful for you to evaluate making such a change. It’s called the C.L.A.M.P.S. model and here’s a quick overview:

CHALLENGE

 People often change jobs because they are not being challenged in their work. No one wants to do the same things every day and people need to feel that their work is meaningful. A new challenge might be something that gets your juices flowing again.

LOCATION

This one is self-explanatory. I often work with people whose job search is driven by a desire to leave or get to a new or former location. Many times I see people who are trying to get closer to family.

ADVANCEMENT

I would say this is the most common reason I’ve found for why someone would consider a job change. Many are driven to climb the corporate ladder and change jobs solely to get a promotion or expansion in scope of responsibility.

MONEY

Another self-explanatory reason. I am wary of those who would change jobs only for the increased compensation. I would say that if this is your primary motivator you should be careful because changing jobs solely for the money can be a path to unhappiness. Making more is great but you could find yourself chasing ever increasing compensation and become a “job hopper” which will impact your future marketability.

PEOPLE

Many candidates I work with are unhappy with the people they work for or with. It’s important that you have good chemistry with your manager/peers/subordinates. If you can’t see yourself working with these folks long term then it might be time to kick off a search.

STABILITY

People need to feel like the company they work for has a future. If that future seems shaky then it can be a huge driver for someone to seek other employment. Employers could do a better job of making sure employees know they have a future.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy expanding upon the C.L.A.M.P.S. model with you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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