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Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Are You Having Fun?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Manufacturing Practice

Are you having fun?

I was thinking about work and how sometimes it’s tough to get motivated and other times it’s really easy. I have noticed that I have fun at work when my customers are happy about our service and vice versa. Here’s the thing: life is too short to work with jerks or people you don’t connect well with. One of my clients told me recently that she wants her people to have fun at work because they spend so much time there. I like that mentality a lot.

serviceI hope you are having fun working and, when you work with TYGES, it is something you look back on as a positive experience. If it is not positive, then let us know. And, if it is positive, then let us know that too.

I received this note a while back in an email from one of our candidates,

“I have worked with a few recruiters and must say that my experience with you and TYGES has been the best.”

Similar to the above I received this note recently from a candidate that we have in process,

“I am impressed with your preparation assistance.”

That’s fun to me.  I like the service aspect of what I do and it is a motivator for me.

Frankly, it is amazing to me how poorly many recruiters treat their candidates. I just do not understand it. At TYGES, our process is built around making sure that the customer experience is positive, both on the candidate and the client side. respectAs Recruiters, we have to set the tone with the client and the candidate for the relationship and it is in our nature to be impatient for results and answers, but we still need to treat people as we would want to be treated if the roles were reversed.

It’s always a good idea to reflect on your work and “why you work” from time to time. If you’re not having fun at work then maybe it’s time for a change. If you decide that a change is needed or you just want to explore options then call us. Send us your info or check out our list of job openings. I can’t promise we will be able to find you a new career opportunity but I can promise we will try to make the process a positive one.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Trifecta – Make yourself more attractive to Hiring Managers

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

Recruiters spend a lot of time working to find that perfect person who fits a very narrow set of criteria and has the intangibles that make them a good fit with the client. I’m constantly evaluating people based on their work experience, industry experience, location preferences and a host of other things that may or may not be evident by a simple resume perusal.

I remember seeing this chart in a presentation a while back and I even drew a little picture of it in my notebook that I have hanging on the wall in my office.  Many times when I am debating whether someone’s level of fit to a particular position I find myself using this criteria as a guide. I call it The Trifecta.

The Trifecta is a Venn Diagram that describes, in very simple terms, the level of fit that a particular person may or may not possess when it comes to a position I am recruiting.

Let me break it down for you.

There are 3 circles here that each represent some attributes for the particular candidate or job. Skills, Geography & Industry.

  • Skills represent the required experience or skillset that this person must have to be qualified for the role. This might be Education, Experiential or even Knowledge based skills. An example might be someone who has led a lean transformation from the corporate level.
  • Geography is pretty straightforward. It essentially means that the person or job where the role is located is a good fit. Ideally this would be local and within commuting distance but it could also be in a place that is highly desirable for some reason. Maybe it is a virtual role.
  • The final circle is Industry. In the ideal situation the individual or position fits well with the industry background.

Now comes the scoring part of the diagram. As you can see, there are numbers 1, 2, and 3 on the chart.

  • 3 represents a fit for both skills & geography but not industry. This is the least desirable situation as the person might be a good fit based on experience and they are in the right place but they lack experience in that industry. We can’t change this because the person either has it or they don’t.
  • 2 represents a fit for both skills and industry. This is better than 3 because we can do something to change this.  Ex – We can relocate the individual to the location where the job needs them to be.
  • 1 is The Trifecta. The individual has the skills, industry experience and is located in the right geography. This is what we are looking for in the perfect world.

What does this mean for you as a Job Seeker or Hiring Authority?

As a Job Seeker, try to find positions where you meet The Trifecta. This means that you are local, meet the skills requirements and also have experience in the industry. In the popular vernacular this is a “no brainer” for the person who receives your resume. You’ll get an interview, which is what you are after.

As a Hiring Authority, this means that you are screening for skills, industry & geography as you scan resumes and talk with potential candidates. Clearly those who bring The Trifecta are your ideal fit and you can focus on confirming that the cultural fit is there in the interview process.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Scarcity – Steve Ballmer, The LA Clippers and Recruiting

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

A while back my boss shared a blog post about scarcity and it really resonated with me. The blog post discussed how Steve Ballmer of Microsoft had purchased the NBA franchise L.A. steve ballmerClippers for a heap of money and how many people think that he overpaid. The author of the blog was making the point that there are only 2 NBA franchises in L.A. and the result is that the commodity is very scarce. Steve Ballmer recognized this and snapped them up because the odds are slim that he will ever get another chance to own one of the NBA franchises in L.A.

I was thinking about how this applies to hiring and recruiting.

In most cases, my clients bring me into the search process after they have exhausted all their own resources via job postings, career board searches and maybe even some networking using a social media platform. By the time I get the call, the client has done their best to fill the role without engaging me. I like this as a recruiter because it meansscarcity2 there is urgency and the client is convinced that the only way to make the hire is to call in an expert search agent. In terms of scarcity, this also means that the person that the client is looking for is scarce in terms of their talent and experience.

I like this as well because it means the client is prepared to follow through with the steps in the process quickly, help me sell the opportunity and make an acceptable offer of compensation. If the client has a sense of urgency and is prepared to follow through and be a partner in the process, then it all boils down to my ability to find and engage the right people. At that point, I control my own destiny as a recruiter.

As a Hiring Manager, you need to ask yourself if you are committed to the hiring process before you call in a search agent. Once you engage someone like me then you are admitting that the person you need is a scarce resource and needs to be treated as such. Much like the L.A. Clippers franchise, you might have to overpay a bit because there are only a few of these people out there and just the fact that they are talking to you means that you need to treat them differently than someone whose resume came to you from a job board.

As a candidate in the job market, you need to think about what it is that you do or have done in the past that makes you a scarce resource. If you can identify what it is that makes you scarce then you can use that as a selling point when you are in job search mode. If you are happy in your job and not in job search mode, you need to at least be thinking about how to gain experience that makes you a scarce resource. If something changes in the future and you become more of an active searcher then this scarcity will determine your success or failure as you search for a new position.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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What criteria do you use to judge when it is time to change jobs?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Division

How do you know when it is time to start a new job search? I often talk with people whochange8 are unsure if now is the right time for a change and they often miss out on good opportunities. Only you can judge if now is the right time and it costs nothing except time to look at a new opportunity. I can tell you that, as a recruiter, I only want someone to change jobs if it is truly a better situation for them and their family.

Clearly, a job change is a personal decision.

To help with that decision, here are some criteria that I think would be helpful for you to evaluate making such a change. It’s called the C.L.A.M.P.S. model and here’s a quick overview:

CHALLENGE

 People often change jobs because they are not being challenged in their work. No one wants to do the same things every day and people need to feel that their work is meaningful. A new challenge might be something that gets your juices flowing again.

LOCATION

This one is self-explanatory. I often work with people whose job search is driven by a desire to leave or get to a new or former location. Many times I see people who are trying to get closer to family.

ADVANCEMENT

I would say this is the most common reason I’ve found for why someone would consider a job change. Many are driven to climb the corporate ladder and change jobs solely to get a promotion or expansion in scope of responsibility.

MONEY

Another self-explanatory reason. I am wary of those who would change jobs only for the increased compensation. I would say that if this is your primary motivator you should be careful because changing jobs solely for the money can be a path to unhappiness. Making more is great but you could find yourself chasing ever increasing compensation and become a “job hopper” which will impact your future marketability.

PEOPLE

Many candidates I work with are unhappy with the people they work for or with. It’s important that you have good chemistry with your manager/peers/subordinates. If you can’t see yourself working with these folks long term then it might be time to kick off a search.

STABILITY

People need to feel like the company they work for has a future. If that future seems shaky then it can be a huge driver for someone to seek other employment. Employers could do a better job of making sure employees know they have a future.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy expanding upon the C.L.A.M.P.S. model with you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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