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The Next Chapter

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Commercial Growth

From time to time as we navigate our life or career we need to step back and ask ourselves a very important question?

What’s the next chapter?

And when we do ask this question…we need a plan to help knock down the barriers that we “assume” are in front of us.  This is important at any stage in your career, as it is pretty hard to accomplish a goal if you do not have one.  This becomes even more important to us as we navigate the short runway towards the end of our careers.  The odds of “success” just falling into your lap, without a goal and a strong plan to obtain it, are pretty slim.  I guess it can happen; however, if that’s our plan, perhaps we can go buy a lotto ticket later today.  But seriously, if you are looking to plan the next chapter in your career, here are “Five Barrier Busters” as written by Don Tebbe that will help.

don tebbeDon Tebbe wrote this great article called “Five Barriers Between You and Your Life’s Next Chapter.”  (Click on the title to read)  As baby boomers reach the tail end of their careers and our life expectancy is getting longer, we need to have a plan to make the most of “The Next Chapter.”  Don lays out five simple barriers that you will need to overcome.  As he puts it:

“Retirement needn’t be an “on-off switch.” You may choose a phased retirement, shifting gradually into “what’s next.”

Here at TYGES, we are looking for a partner in Chicago, IL that is ready for their next chapter.  Are you ready to utilize your industry experience as you gradually shift toward retirement?  If so, give me a call.  If not, we can still be of help as we value long-term relationships and strive to maintain them through out your career working with top-tier clients in the Industrial Manufacturing, AeroSpace, and Defense B2B industries.  For the last 15 years, we have placed north of 1,000 “key” players, helping them on their trajectory toward “The Next Chapter” in their careers.  We can do the same for you.

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at https://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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March Madness & Hiring

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

It’s maddening!!!!!!!!!!!!!

March is a crazy time for college basketball and my wife tells my kids that I may be difficult to communicate with given it is my favorite time of year and my favorite sport to follow. march madness4

The funny thing is its not only madness in basketball but is seems to be a crazy time for hiring right now as well. Whatever your political affiliation is, the new administration, along with many other things are driving confidence in to the markets as evidenced by the DOW crossing of 20,000 a month or so ago. I would argue that all of this is artificial but it does drive spending by consumers that drives sales by companies that drives purchasing by companies and hiring of people. It’s a cycle where capitalism is at its best.

One of the companies that the stock guru’s like to follow is Parker Hannifin Corporation based in Ohio. They make motion and control systems used in a broad set of aerospace & industrial businesses. march madness5They credit Parker’s work over the past few years in the areas of “cost containment” and putting themselves in a position to grow when the time is right. They controlled costs in the flatter season and even built a cash reserve that has allowed them to recently announce the acquisition of Clarcor (filtration manufacturer) which will drive a new revenue stream for PH. The original article can be found HERE.

Why do I share this information on Parker Hannifin and what does it have to do with Basketball? While Parker and for that matter other companies in the Industrial B2B space are seeing benefits of their hard work over the past few years, the real question is:

“Do they have the Talent to deal with the next few years as confidence (artificial or not) grows and more relevant people leave the workforce (primarily baby boomers)?”

Parker has 354 openings on their website and I’m sure this is just a fraction of what they really need. As a Industrial B2B recruiter, we had a record year last year and are on track to do it again this year. march madness3

The challenge is not finding the open orders but rather finding and convincing the talent to leave their organization for a new role.

If you are in a hiring capacity here are a four things to consider as we go further in to 2017:

  • Cost – Talent is going to cost you more – the concept of internal equity needs to be tossed out the window. It is no longer relevant.
  • Better Processes – You’re going to need to speed up the process on your side if you are the employer. The best talent has no interest in going to work for a slow moving and indecisive company.
  • Focus on your existing team – You’re going to see turnover increase (mostly voluntary) as the full-court press is coming. People that have been passed over for promotions or given measly raises are now getting called about jobs that are a step up in title, responsibility and compensation (some 20+% increases).
  • Better, not perfect – If you’re looking for the “perfect” individual with a stellar work history plan on not finding them. Stellar histories have faded in the past decade and it’s not the individual’s fault but rather the company in my opinion. We have a saying – “Don’t let perfection get in the way of getting better.”

I could go on and on but you get the point. The reality of it is it may look like good times ahead but it will be maddening to say the least in the next couple of years as companies jockey for the same Talent. It will also be fun to watch. As will be the Basketball – Enjoy.

This is just one man’s opinion. I would appreciate your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Achieve Your Goals with 3 Steps

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Commercial Growth

Why is it that some people just have goals and other’s obtain them?  What if their secret to success is simple?  It is…if you follow these 3 Steps.

Your goal is just a dream or vision if it isn’t written down.  A written goal is like a destination that you want to go to; but, you haven’t been there before.

The power of a writing down your goals is bigger than you think.  warningI read a great book by Tony J. Hughes called The Joshua Principle.  It cited a study from a graduation class that only 3% of students had specific written goals at graduation.  When these graduates were surveyed twenty years later, this minority (3%) made more money than the other 97% combined.

Step One is to write down your goals.  Once that is completed, two things usually happen.  One, the excitement will kick in and you will more than likely jump straight to Step Three and GO or two, you will do nothing at all.  Don’t make these mistakes. To use a driving analogy, let’s say you are in your car and you want to get to a destination that you haven’t been to before.  First, you would obtain a physical address and type it into your GPS or let Siri know where you wanted to go.  To take some words from the group Clash, “Should I STAY or should I GO now?”  What’s your answer:

ANSWER:  STAY

So, your in your car, GPS set…what if you just sit there, engine running, with your car in park?

I realize that this doesn’t make any sense.  But seriously, have you ever had a goal that you didn’t start to do what was necessary to obtain it?  Today? 2017? 2016? 2015? 2014?   If we’re honest with ourselves, it is no different than sitting in a running car, GPS set, and our gear in park.

Everything you need, just no driver.

ANSWER:  GO

Why do so many people veer off the course at this point and fail to obtain their goals?

To keep with the driving analogy.  Now your car is in drive and you are making “progress” toward your destination (written goal).   Once the destination (goal) is set, your GPS or mobile device is ready to give you directions, step by step, to your set destination (goal).
car-shoulderPerhaps, your car is out of line or doesn’t have enough gas…meaning, even though you are trying to drive toward your goal, which is commendable, your car keeps wanting to veer off course or worse yet, run out of gas.  Your car needs a simple alignment and a full tank.  In our case, we might need some time to think things out, create a detailed plan, and get some help, guidance, knowledge, or other resources to keep us from veering off course and stay aligned to our goal(s).  Not only will it take less effort in the long run, it will get you there with less wear-and-tear on your car (you).

OK, so what is the Second Step?

failure-jordan2In my opinion, failure is not a bad thing, at least an effort is being made to get to your goal.  Failure is just one step towards your success.  On top of that, valuable things will be learned along the way.  I believe that we fall short of our goals because we leave out Step Two all to often.

Before you jump in the car and go, you need to do Step Two and ask yourself three questions:  #1 Why?  #2 When?  #3 How?

These three questions are vital as they fuel your passion providing motivation (WHY), set a timeline/deadline (WHEN), and create a well thought out plan and/or establish needs/resources (HOW).

Don’t miss this…Step Two is the hardest and most important step.  

Let’s keep with the driving analogy and set our destination(goal) for a new restaurant we have been wanting to try out.  How could we fail at such a simple goal?  Well…to keep things simple, perhaps you “really” aren’t hungry (WHY), or you missed your reservation time and they’re booked up when you arrive (WHEN), or you left the house without your wallet (HOW).  All three areas (questions) need to be aligned for your goal(s) to be obtained.

These tips will help you on your current journey to obtain your goals.  If you haven’t set your goals just yet, no worries.  The great thing about setting written goals, they can be set at any time.  It doesn’t have to be done when a new year arrives.  If you want to make something better or obtain something great, take these three simple steps:

Step One – Write down your goal(s).

Step Two – Ask yourself/team three questions: Why? When? How?

Step Three – Go!

One last thought…nothing great really happens by accident or is going to show up at your doorstep.  Extraordinary things, take extraordinary people, with extraordinary effort. We are all capable of being extraordinary, it’s a choice.  Bottom line…the secret to success is you.  Good luck!

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at https://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Tony Romo Demonstrates Leadership – The Essence of Meritocracy

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

With all that has been happening over the past month relative to politics I thought would share something that struck me this week as a proper approach to dealing with a difficult situation. Hard to believe I’m talking about Tony Romo – For those of you that do not follow football – he is or was the quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys for the past decade. He took the helm from Drew Bledsoe (if you remember from our last write up he was the QB displaced by Tom Brady in New England). Tony Romo is a guy who has been plagued with injuriesromo2 over his career and seemed to be the leader of a team that always fell short of their expectations. Well, earlier this year, Tony Romo was injured again and they had to turn to rookie QB Dak Prescott who was unproven. Fast forward to today and Dak has led the team to 9 wins & 1 loss while Tony Romo has been healing. He has brought leadership and hope to this organization. For the past 6 weeks the media has been trying to drive a wedge into the Cowboys organization by questioning who would be the QB when Tony Romo came back.

Tony Romo addressed it in a 6 minute press conference this week – It’s worth the WATCH

I’ve never been a fan but I have a new found respect for Tony Romo who demonstrated true leadership, what it means to be humble, and sharing with people what I believe is a true failure in our society today. He shared that professional football is a meritocracy. What is meritocracy – According to Wikipedia: “it is a political philosophy holding that power should be vested in individuals almost exclusively based on ability and talent.romo3 Advancement in such a system is based on performance measured through examination and/or demonstrated achievement in the field where it is implemented.” He goes on to say that you have to earn it each and every week in the NFL.

My question is, “What if we all took that approach and attitude in life?”

Yes we should be recognized for what we did yesterday but we should never expect to be given something for nothing. We have to come out each day and bring the best attitude & effort we can and EARN what we want. Instead, over the last decade our society seems to be moving steadily toward one where people expect something for nothing. In a sense, welfare. Don’t get me wrong, I believe there are people that need to be helped and we are called to help them but we need to not only give to them but to walk with them and help them get on their own feet. There will always be people that will need assistance (some short-term & some long-term) and it is our responsibility to care for them. The people I’m talking about are the ones that think the world/their family/society/the government/their employer owes them something. You are not owed anything except the wonderful opportunity to get out of bed each day and make a choice on what you will do with your day.

So I end this month’s write-up with a tip of the hat to Mr. Romo. romo4Thank you for taking time to share this with everyone.

This is just one man’s opinion and I’d appreciate your thoughts.

PS – it’s great time of year to stop, reflect and remember to be thankful. While things may seem insurmountable at times, be thankful for the small things. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Clarity & the New England Patriots – what do they have in common?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Let me start this conversation by saying I’m not a Patriots fan. In fact, they are considered the enemy to my lowly Miami Dolphins who have brought nothing but disappointment for two decades running. While the Patriots may be the enemy I have an enormous amount of respect for the leadership and their process. patriots5Yes, they’ve been criticized over the years for filming others practices, deflating footballs, etc. but the reality is their leadership has built a culture of excellence for two decades running. I remember when Drew Bledsoe went down in the second game in 2001 with an injury. My first thought was ouch – my second thought was we may have a shot with Bledsoe gone because they are putting in this unknown quarterback drafted in the 6th round from Michigan named Tom Brady. Even after starting the year 0-2, this no-name steps up and carries them to the Super Bowl Championship and the end of the Drew Bledsoe era.

Earlier this year, Brady was suspended for the first four games of the regular season, up steps the #2 quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo (who?) and they win their first two games. He gets injured in game two and up steps the #3 quarterback Jacoby Brissett (who?) and they go 1 – 1 with him. Tom Brady comes back in game 5 and wins. Now they are 5-1 and arguably one of the strongest teams in the NFL.

So what is it they have that allows them to keep performing at a high level regardless of injuries, distractions (think Aaron Hernandez), etc.? 

The conversation above is centered around quarterbacks but reality is they’ve had injuries and distractions across the board but for some reason they keep winning. The Pats have 124 wins over the past decade (#1 in the NFL and 20 more than the second team – Indianapolis). It starts with Leadership – Robert Kraft at the helm of the Patriots and his head coach Bill Belichick who joined the Pats in 2000. patriots3These two gentlemen are the clear leaders (not the players). They have established a culture of team first and have put a system in place where average players perform way above their individual capability. Tom Brady is a great quarterback because he plays within the New England Patriots system. Could he play elsewhere? Yes he could but the question is whether he would be as effective. I highly doubt it.

So what is it they have? 1) Clear leadership – Kraft & Belichick 2) Clear Systems & Processes 3) Clear Culture – you join the patriots they don’t join you 4) Clear role definition – everyone has a role to play. Yes they have talent but it’s the talent that fits their culture & their schemes – not the other way around. Corporations talk about talent like it’s the magic recipe to fixing everything. patriots4It doesn’t hurt to have talent on the team but without Clarity of Leadership, Systems, Processes, Culture, & Role Definition, it is pretty hard to be win as a team.

I’d appreciate your thoughts even if you don’t like football.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Are You Having Fun?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Manufacturing Practice

Are you having fun?

I was thinking about work and how sometimes it’s tough to get motivated and other times it’s really easy. I have noticed that I have fun at work when my customers are happy about our service and vice versa. Here’s the thing: life is too short to work with jerks or people you don’t connect well with. One of my clients told me recently that she wants her people to have fun at work because they spend so much time there. I like that mentality a lot.

serviceI hope you are having fun working and, when you work with TYGES, it is something you look back on as a positive experience. If it is not positive, then let us know. And, if it is positive, then let us know that too.

I received this note a while back in an email from one of our candidates,

“I have worked with a few recruiters and must say that my experience with you and TYGES has been the best.”

Similar to the above I received this note recently from a candidate that we have in process,

“I am impressed with your preparation assistance.”

That’s fun to me.  I like the service aspect of what I do and it is a motivator for me.

Frankly, it is amazing to me how poorly many recruiters treat their candidates. I just do not understand it. At TYGES, our process is built around making sure that the customer experience is positive, both on the candidate and the client side. respectAs Recruiters, we have to set the tone with the client and the candidate for the relationship and it is in our nature to be impatient for results and answers, but we still need to treat people as we would want to be treated if the roles were reversed.

It’s always a good idea to reflect on your work and “why you work” from time to time. If you’re not having fun at work then maybe it’s time for a change. If you decide that a change is needed or you just want to explore options then call us. Send us your info or check out our list of job openings. I can’t promise we will be able to find you a new career opportunity but I can promise we will try to make the process a positive one.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Problem With Integrity

Written by:  Ted Fletcher, Account Executive

While the author is unknown to me, you may have heard the saying “Tell a lie ONCE and all your truths become questionable.” LieEveryone has worked in environments where integrity is not highly prized in word AND deed. You may feel contaminated or complicit simply because of guilt by association. Lack of integrity is slimy and casts its practitioners in a very poor light. The problem is that integrity is inconvenient. You may not close the deal, sell the product, win the election, because of that meddlesome nine-letter word. But you’ll also feel cleaner and build a good reputation which “is worth more than fine gold.” Integrity is freeing.

The natural inclination for a person or business is to take the easier route and not operate with integrity. But honesty and integrity are intentional, akin to strengthening a muscle through exercise. It won’t get stronger if not utilized.

I work in the world of recruiting, an industry sometimes characterized by less-than-above-board practices (here’s a plug for TYGES International…if you’re in the world of Industrial Manufacturing, TYGES is a search firm you should really consider working with for many reasons, one of which is our values).

easy routeWhoever you are, you (we) will undoubtedly approach a fork in your road today and will have to make a split-second decision to either act with integrity…or not. And when we DO take the easy route, hopefully we’ll taste the bitterness and determine to take the road less traveled next time.

Integrity is by all accounts a GOOD thing. Lack of integrity is a BAD thing. I want to do business with people whom I can trust, and so do you. So, whatever our context, occupation, etc., let’s have an excellent day and take the road less traveled.

I encourage your feedback and would enjoy being a “Career Coach” for you.  You can learn more about me HERE, also you can follow me on LinkedIn and/or on Twitter as I focus on helping make good things happen to other people. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Integrated Talent Chain – Part III

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

As a follow up to our series over the past couple of months, this is Part III (Part I, Part II)  in our series evaluating what it takes to put a true Integrated Talent Chain in place and make it a competitive weapon for your company.  Now that we have an understanding of current inventory and forecasted needs as well as turnover, let’s talk about what it takes to attract talent.

Question 1 – Do you have an Employment Brand?

What exactly does this mean? I boil it down to this one statement – it is why people come to work for your company and ultimately why they stay.  what is employee brandingThey may not stay forever but there is something that attracted them. A fancy brand, cool products, great giveaways, a specific location, the opportunities, the career pathing, the industry, etc. These are all examples of why people join companies and defining what is very unique about your company is important in defining who you are. A good place to start is a clear Mission that is meaningful and impactful to a person’s life. Talk about what you are trying to do as a company – your Vision. Make sure people understand your Core Values & Beliefs. From there you can then decipher the answer to your Employment Brand and learn how to share it appropriately. My warning to you is a cool product is not the answer; free coffee is not the answer; ping pong is not the answer – it is something much more impactful that stands the test of time. Yes it will be tweaked as time progresses but the core of who you are should not. This can be a very challenging exercise to go through as you have to get in touch with what is really the purpose of your business.

Question 2 – Do you have a clear Talent Acquisition Process?

You want to frustrate high potential talent, have an unclear, ever changing process with no repeatability and no speed. This is where most companies fail miserably. First their posture is to start from an arrogant perspective (my opinion) where they believe the talent will wait on them and they need to demonstrate their value to the company only when in reality when you are pursuing high potential talent it’s always a two way process. 1 way 2 wayHere’s my position on the process:

  • It should be well defined using standard work such that wherever a person interviews in the world they will have the same experience
  • Right up front – when you first speak to the individual, layout the process and make it very clear to them what they should expect as it pertains to steps & timeline. I can only think of one client in our lineup that I can honestly say does a good job of this. Most companies miss this mark.
  • As part of the process it needs to be swift and decisive. If the process is well documented up front, you can move people through the process at a good pace and make a decisive yes or no – if it’s a maybe it’s a no. I have heard the term “keep them warm” over a 100 times in my career – this is a joke. When I hear this I tell the individual to move on.
  • Don’t start the process unless you have preauthorization to hire someone. It’s a waste of time to get someone to the final stage of the interviews only to put them in a holding pattern while you run it up the presumable ladder for approval. This should be a foregone conclusion that you can hire this person. World class is the person leaves your building with an offer in hand. I’ve seen a lot of this 1 up process instilled over the years where the hiring manager is required to interview the person and weigh in on the decision. This is a failure as you are not fixing the process but rather inspecting every product.
  • If more than a few people have to interview the person like the boss’s boss as an example you have the wrong leader in the hiring capacity – replace them or replace yourself.
  • Don’t let perfection get in the way of getting better. There is no perfect person out there. Your focus should be on the journey at hand which is getting better daily.

Question 3 – Do you have the capacity to recruit & develop talent?

Recruiting good talent is difficult. It’s not about finding a resume online or a LinkedIn profile that’s looks good that makes it difficult. It’s a courting process just like it would be looking for a lifelong partner. It takes a lot work to source, call, qualify, recruit, attract and get the person on-boarded. When I hear an internal recruiter tell me they are personally working 20+ jobs at the same time, it’s a recipe for disaster. HelpIn my office, we estimate that a professional recruiter (working 50 hours/week) can work between 4-7 orders at any given time and actually have an impact. Especially given the amount of non-value added things that have been added to the process with applicant tracking systems, etc. I feel bad for most internal recruiters because of the unrealistic expectations put on them. If you’re going to get serious about recruiting you need to have the proper capacity with the proper tools and skills to be successful.

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? I’m talking about a formal Talent Development process in which I will discuss in Part 4.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback on anything. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.   You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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