Posted on

Light It Up Blue #LIUB

Written by:  Victoria Terrill, Account Manager Health Care

April 2nd was World Autism Awareness Day or Light It Up Blue Day. Annually observed, this year’s event was a huge success with supporters around the world celebrating the day together. LIUB TYGESMany wore a blue article of clothing (bright royal blue is the official color for the National Autism Awareness Month); others trended autism support on social media by posting about it using the hashtag #LIUB; some changed their social media profile picture to have a filter related to Light It Up Blue; and others joined in by decorating and brightening up their homes, businesses, and global landmarks with blue lights. President Trump and First Lady Melania lit the exterior of the White House blue during the evening. Many other celebrities got into the spirit, too, by posting about it on social media (Justin Trudeau, Danny Trejo, SIA, Katie Couric, Holly Robinson Peete, Carole King, Tony Dovolani, and Bryce Dallas Howard to name a few). As much fun as the day is to celebrate, it has an important, more substantive goal: to raise awareness of autism spectrum disorder.  So I propose two questions:

“Why can’t every day be autism awareness day?

Why should “Light It Up Blue” for the whole month of April ONLY be in April?”

In my experience both with volunteering and recruiting for different organizations in the ABA Therapy field, I’ve found that individuals on the spectrum have the same needs, wants, and dreams as people who are not diagnosed with autism. By having an understanding of autism and intellectual disabilities in general, you can promote others’ understanding of it and aid those affected from it. liub2Instead of devoting our efforts to this goal one day a year, we need to educate others about autism every day.

While the hype of World Autism Awareness Day does raise awareness, the long term goal is to secure the inclusion and acceptance of individuals on the autism spectrum. These goals do not just begin and end in April.

We need to take an everyday approach, not a one day per year approach.

I personally love the enthusiasm that comes with dedicating April 2nd to educating people on Autism Spectrum Disorder but we need more autism advocates! So the next time that you put on the blue t-shirt you have laying around your closet, remember that you can and are being an advocate for someone with autism spectrum disorder regardless of what day of the year it is.

VICTORIAWorking as a recruiter in the ABA Therapy field is more than finding the best board certified behavior analysts in the country, it’s about being “all in” this movement to help others.  I welcome your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn and on Twitter. You can learn more about me HERE as I focus on helping those within the world of Autism. Learn more about TYGES on our website, Twitter, LinkedIn, and or on Facebook.

Our mission is simple:

“We’re here to make good things happen to other people.”

stack-logo-png

Posted on

Achieve Your Goals with 3 Steps

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Commercial Growth

Why is it that some people just have goals and other’s obtain them?  What if their secret to success is simple?  It is…if you follow these 3 Steps.

Your goal is just a dream or vision if it isn’t written down.  A written goal is like a destination that you want to go to; but, you haven’t been there before.

The power of a writing down your goals is bigger than you think.  warningI read a great book by Tony J. Hughes called The Joshua Principle.  It cited a study from a graduation class that only 3% of students had specific written goals at graduation.  When these graduates were surveyed twenty years later, this minority (3%) made more money than the other 97% combined.

Step One is to write down your goals.  Once that is completed, two things usually happen.  One, the excitement will kick in and you will more than likely jump straight to Step Three and GO or two, you will do nothing at all.  Don’t make these mistakes. To use a driving analogy, let’s say you are in your car and you want to get to a destination that you haven’t been to before.  First, you would obtain a physical address and type it into your GPS or let Siri know where you wanted to go.  To take some words from the group Clash, “Should I STAY or should I GO now?”  What’s your answer:

ANSWER:  STAY

So, your in your car, GPS set…what if you just sit there, engine running, with your car in park?

I realize that this doesn’t make any sense.  But seriously, have you ever had a goal that you didn’t start to do what was necessary to obtain it?  Today? 2017? 2016? 2015? 2014?   If we’re honest with ourselves, it is no different than sitting in a running car, GPS set, and our gear in park.

Everything you need, just no driver.

ANSWER:  GO

Why do so many people veer off the course at this point and fail to obtain their goals?

To keep with the driving analogy.  Now your car is in drive and you are making “progress” toward your destination (written goal).   Once the destination (goal) is set, your GPS or mobile device is ready to give you directions, step by step, to your set destination (goal).
car-shoulderPerhaps, your car is out of line or doesn’t have enough gas…meaning, even though you are trying to drive toward your goal, which is commendable, your car keeps wanting to veer off course or worse yet, run out of gas.  Your car needs a simple alignment and a full tank.  In our case, we might need some time to think things out, create a detailed plan, and get some help, guidance, knowledge, or other resources to keep us from veering off course and stay aligned to our goal(s).  Not only will it take less effort in the long run, it will get you there with less wear-and-tear on your car (you).

OK, so what is the Second Step?

failure-jordan2In my opinion, failure is not a bad thing, at least an effort is being made to get to your goal.  Failure is just one step towards your success.  On top of that, valuable things will be learned along the way.  I believe that we fall short of our goals because we leave out Step Two all to often.

Before you jump in the car and go, you need to do Step Two and ask yourself three questions:  #1 Why?  #2 When?  #3 How?

These three questions are vital as they fuel your passion providing motivation (WHY), set a timeline/deadline (WHEN), and create a well thought out plan and/or establish needs/resources (HOW).

Don’t miss this…Step Two is the hardest and most important step.  

Let’s keep with the driving analogy and set our destination(goal) for a new restaurant we have been wanting to try out.  How could we fail at such a simple goal?  Well…to keep things simple, perhaps you “really” aren’t hungry (WHY), or you missed your reservation time and they’re booked up when you arrive (WHEN), or you left the house without your wallet (HOW).  All three areas (questions) need to be aligned for your goal(s) to be obtained.

These tips will help you on your current journey to obtain your goals.  If you haven’t set your goals just yet, no worries.  The great thing about setting written goals, they can be set at any time.  It doesn’t have to be done when a new year arrives.  If you want to make something better or obtain something great, take these three simple steps:

Step One – Write down your goal(s).

Step Two – Ask yourself/team three questions: Why? When? How?

Step Three – Go!

One last thought…nothing great really happens by accident or is going to show up at your doorstep.  Extraordinary things, take extraordinary people, with extraordinary effort. We are all capable of being extraordinary, it’s a choice.  Bottom line…the secret to success is you.  Good luck!

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at https://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on

Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on

The Problem With Integrity

Written by:  Ted Fletcher, Account Executive

While the author is unknown to me, you may have heard the saying “Tell a lie ONCE and all your truths become questionable.” LieEveryone has worked in environments where integrity is not highly prized in word AND deed. You may feel contaminated or complicit simply because of guilt by association. Lack of integrity is slimy and casts its practitioners in a very poor light. The problem is that integrity is inconvenient. You may not close the deal, sell the product, win the election, because of that meddlesome nine-letter word. But you’ll also feel cleaner and build a good reputation which “is worth more than fine gold.” Integrity is freeing.

The natural inclination for a person or business is to take the easier route and not operate with integrity. But honesty and integrity are intentional, akin to strengthening a muscle through exercise. It won’t get stronger if not utilized.

I work in the world of recruiting, an industry sometimes characterized by less-than-above-board practices (here’s a plug for TYGES International…if you’re in the world of Industrial Manufacturing, TYGES is a search firm you should really consider working with for many reasons, one of which is our values).

easy routeWhoever you are, you (we) will undoubtedly approach a fork in your road today and will have to make a split-second decision to either act with integrity…or not. And when we DO take the easy route, hopefully we’ll taste the bitterness and determine to take the road less traveled next time.

Integrity is by all accounts a GOOD thing. Lack of integrity is a BAD thing. I want to do business with people whom I can trust, and so do you. So, whatever our context, occupation, etc., let’s have an excellent day and take the road less traveled.

I encourage your feedback and would enjoy being a “Career Coach” for you.  You can learn more about me HERE, also you can follow me on LinkedIn and/or on Twitter as I focus on helping make good things happen to other people. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on

The Trifecta – Make yourself more attractive to Hiring Managers

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

Recruiters spend a lot of time working to find that perfect person who fits a very narrow set of criteria and has the intangibles that make them a good fit with the client. I’m constantly evaluating people based on their work experience, industry experience, location preferences and a host of other things that may or may not be evident by a simple resume perusal.

I remember seeing this chart in a presentation a while back and I even drew a little picture of it in my notebook that I have hanging on the wall in my office.  Many times when I am debating whether someone’s level of fit to a particular position I find myself using this criteria as a guide. I call it The Trifecta.

The Trifecta is a Venn Diagram that describes, in very simple terms, the level of fit that a particular person may or may not possess when it comes to a position I am recruiting.

Let me break it down for you.

There are 3 circles here that each represent some attributes for the particular candidate or job. Skills, Geography & Industry.

  • Skills represent the required experience or skillset that this person must have to be qualified for the role. This might be Education, Experiential or even Knowledge based skills. An example might be someone who has led a lean transformation from the corporate level.
  • Geography is pretty straightforward. It essentially means that the person or job where the role is located is a good fit. Ideally this would be local and within commuting distance but it could also be in a place that is highly desirable for some reason. Maybe it is a virtual role.
  • The final circle is Industry. In the ideal situation the individual or position fits well with the industry background.

Now comes the scoring part of the diagram. As you can see, there are numbers 1, 2, and 3 on the chart.

  • 3 represents a fit for both skills & geography but not industry. This is the least desirable situation as the person might be a good fit based on experience and they are in the right place but they lack experience in that industry. We can’t change this because the person either has it or they don’t.
  • 2 represents a fit for both skills and industry. This is better than 3 because we can do something to change this.  Ex – We can relocate the individual to the location where the job needs them to be.
  • 1 is The Trifecta. The individual has the skills, industry experience and is located in the right geography. This is what we are looking for in the perfect world.

What does this mean for you as a Job Seeker or Hiring Authority?

As a Job Seeker, try to find positions where you meet The Trifecta. This means that you are local, meet the skills requirements and also have experience in the industry. In the popular vernacular this is a “no brainer” for the person who receives your resume. You’ll get an interview, which is what you are after.

As a Hiring Authority, this means that you are screening for skills, industry & geography as you scan resumes and talk with potential candidates. Clearly those who bring The Trifecta are your ideal fit and you can focus on confirming that the cultural fit is there in the interview process.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack2.jpg

Posted on

8 Ways to Help a Recruiter Find a New Role for You

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

I often talk to candidates who have worked diligently to find a new role but have failed time and time again to find something suitable. Often, they have interviewed several times only to come in second. It amazes me that these same candidates expect a recruiter to able to wave his or her magic wand and get them in front of a dozen great companies who are hiring. choices3Let me be honest with you: I do not have a magic wand and I do not know any recruiter who has one either. I do know that finding a new role is tough and is made even more so by those who will not help themselves.

Having said this, I have some ideas for those who work with recruiters that will maximize the value you receive from that relationship.

  1. Treat the recruiter like the valuable resource they are. Be honest and open with them about what you want to do and where you want to go. Help them form a clear picture of what you want.
  2. Time kills all deals. Never waste the recruiter’s time by professing to have interest in a role when you really don’t. Make sure you do your due diligence and then pursue the role with all of your energy.
  3. No surprises. Be open with them about everything. This includes the good, the bad, and the ugly. Don’t set the recruiter up to fail by withholding information about why you left your previous job, etc.
  4. Follow the recruiter’s advice in all things related to the job search. Remember, this person makes a living finding people like you a job. When the recruiter tells you not to discuss something with the hiring authority, then don’t. If you are unclear on what you should or should not discuss, then ask.
  5. Get organized. Know what companies have been given your credentials in the past. Don’t set the recruiter up to give a company a resume that is already on file.
  6. Prep. Prep. Prep. When you go into an interview, you should know everything publicly available about the company and the role. Who are the decision makers? What are they looking for in a candidate? Why have others done poorly in interviews? Get all the information you can from the recruiter about these things so that you can prepare for them.
  7. Process is key. If you are unclear about the recruiter’s process or the company’s hiring process, then ask for clarification. Make sure you do what you say you are going to do when you said you would do it.
  8. Check in on a regular basis. Even if have not heard from the recruiter, you can certainly call or email once every week or so with an update. Nothing keeps your name on someone’s lips like regular communication.

So that’s it.

Help us to help you.

A recruiter can get you into an interview, but it’s up to you to get the call back by showing them what you’re made of when the time comes.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on

Never Stop Learning

Written by:  Carol Zimmerman, Director of Health Care

There’s a syndicated radio show I listen to in the mornings that, for the last couple of weeks, has been having a “Generation X versus Millennials” contest each morning. The Generation X-er (of which I am firmly in the camp) must answer current event and pop culture questions, while the Millennial has to answer trivia from Generation X’s heyday. It’s amazing to me how knowledge moves forward and we lose information that was once so common. Today’s Millennial didn’t know what the letters VCR meant. VCRAnd I’m sure I don’t know who won an MTV award this year.

Career-wise, it’s imperative that you stay on top of your game. But there’s more to it than that. Sure, you’ve attended conferences and know the latest methods, ideology, and trends. But do you know what events may be affecting your clients and customers? Do you know how to interview in an era where putting on your best attire and showing up 15 minutes early just isn’t necessarily how it’s done these days? Do you know how to produce a quality resume and then get it out there? This Gen-X’er recently had to coach a Millennial on how to forward me their resume from their computer.

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” – Mahatma Gandhi

learningMake sure you are taking time to learn new things every day! Read current news or a paperback novel. Look up a place on Google that you’ve never been to and probably never will. But learn just a little something about it. View it on Google Earth. At your favorite restaurant, take time to look up that menu item that you’ve never heard of (tzatziki anyone?). Study up on that latest new electronic gadget, even if you know you will never have a use for it. What does it do? What might it be used for and by whom?

One of my favorite people ever was a highly intelligent international businessperson who never lost his childlike wonder at new gadgets and technology. He wanted to learn it all and was delighted by it all.

Make today the day you start learning something new. Then repeat – every day. We’re never too old and in today’s information and technology age, it has never been easier. You never know when just little tidbits of information will become useful to you in your career.  I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn.  You can learn more about me HERE also you can follow me on twitter @CarolZTI as I focus on helping people just like you maximize their career. Learn more about TYGES on our website, on Twitter @TYGESINT, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on

Are you looking for…

A Rewarding Career with:

Team Pic Social Media

  • Unlimited Earning Potential
  • Advancement
  • Work-Life Balance
  • Benefits
  • Professional Training
  • Growth Oriented Performance Company
  • Base + Commission

 

If you are a driven professional looking for unlimited earning potential, upward mobility, and work-life balance (No Weekends, No Evenings, & No Travel)…then TYGES could be the company for you.

TYGES International is currently accepting applications for our growing team with a potential start date during the month of June 2016.  If you have a driven & professional personality, strong time management skills, computer fluency, a 4 Year Degree, knowledge of Sales, Industrial, Manufacturing, and/or the Healthcare Industries, a strong desire to learn, and an undeniable passion to help others…then we look forward to hearing from you.

Click Here to get started.

You can learn more about TYGES on their website www.tyges.com and stay connected with the latest industry news and resources through TYGES International’s LinkedIn group page, on Twitter, and here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on

Who Has The Loudest Voice At Your Company?

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Operations

Think about that question for a second…every organization has an individual or two that seem to be the loudest.  Loud doesn’t necessarily mean volume; yet, someone who always has something to say.  As Merriam Webster states:

Loud – expressing ideas or opinions in a very open and forceful way

Today, we had some of those voices at the table discussing a “key topic” that has and will impact our future here at TYGES.  As we all shared our ideas, there was one voice that was LOUDER.

There is a voice that doesn’t use words. Listen. – Rumi

This voice, is the voice of our customer.  Our key topic, getting feedback from our customers…the good and the bad.  How do we best serve our customers?

The answer, a LOUD”Listen!”listen

Here at TYGES, we are listening.  Click Here to see what our customers are saying.

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack2.jpg

Posted on

Three Cheers!

Written by:  Victoria Terrill, Account Manager Healthcare Practice

The overall goal in sports is to provide athletes with an experience to get out on the field, court, or mat, and have success. This makes me question:

Why are there not more kids on the spectrum involved in sports? And are there opportunities in their local communities for children on the spectrum to participate in sports?

Click here for the top sports for children with Autism, “The Best Sports for Kids with Autism” identifies mostly individual sports such as swimming, horseback riding, track, bowling, martial arts, etc. During the weekends, I travel around the United States working cheerleading competitions. Though cheerleading is neither listed in the article nor an individual sport, it has the reputation to be cutthroat and judgmental, but when it comes to special needs teams, this isn’t the case at all. The entire audience is rooting for the group to hit a perfect routine on the mat.

While watching special needs teams compete, I have witnessed amazing cheerleading performances during competition in front of thousands of spectators.  It’s even more powerful to experience firsthand the positive reactions from the audience.  After seeing these teams succeed, I would encourage any family to get your child with autism involved in cheerleading or another sport.  Three cheers for getting your child on the spectrum involved with cheerleading or another sport.

Based on what I’ve witnessed during cheerleading competitions, sports can be beneficial by involving special needs individuals and teams, increasing awareness, and opening doors for others to be more accepting and understanding.

With a little bit of research, there ARE options for children on the spectrum to be active and learn life skills through sports.

One of my favorite resources for children on the spectrum is the “Sparkle Effect” which promotes cheer and dance teams with a mix of children with and without disabilities.

Working as a recruiter in the ABA Therapy field, I constantly learn from board certified behavior analysts about their success stories which has heightened my awareness about the success of sports participation for children on the spectrum. I welcome your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn and on Twitter. You can learn more about me HERE as I focus on helping those within the world of Autism. Learn more about TYGES on our website, Twitter, LinkedIn, and or on Facebook.

Our mission is simple:

“We’re here to make good things happen to other people.”

cropped-hr_tyges_stack2.jpg

%d bloggers like this: