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The Next Chapter

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Commercial Growth

From time to time as we navigate our life or career we need to step back and ask ourselves a very important question?

What’s the next chapter?

And when we do ask this question…we need a plan to help knock down the barriers that we “assume” are in front of us.  This is important at any stage in your career, as it is pretty hard to accomplish a goal if you do not have one.  This becomes even more important to us as we navigate the short runway towards the end of our careers.  The odds of “success” just falling into your lap, without a goal and a strong plan to obtain it, are pretty slim.  I guess it can happen; however, if that’s our plan, perhaps we can go buy a lotto ticket later today.  But seriously, if you are looking to plan the next chapter in your career, here are “Five Barrier Busters” as written by Don Tebbe that will help.

don tebbeDon Tebbe wrote this great article called “Five Barriers Between You and Your Life’s Next Chapter.”  (Click on the title to read)  As baby boomers reach the tail end of their careers and our life expectancy is getting longer, we need to have a plan to make the most of “The Next Chapter.”  Don lays out five simple barriers that you will need to overcome.  As he puts it:

“Retirement needn’t be an “on-off switch.” You may choose a phased retirement, shifting gradually into “what’s next.”

Here at TYGES, we are looking for a partner in Chicago, IL that is ready for their next chapter.  Are you ready to utilize your industry experience as you gradually shift toward retirement?  If so, give me a call.  If not, we can still be of help as we value long-term relationships and strive to maintain them through out your career working with top-tier clients in the Industrial Manufacturing, AeroSpace, and Defense B2B industries.  For the last 15 years, we have placed north of 1,000 “key” players, helping them on their trajectory toward “The Next Chapter” in their careers.  We can do the same for you.

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at https://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Light It Up Blue #LIUB

Written by:  Victoria Terrill, Account Manager Health Care

April 2nd was World Autism Awareness Day or Light It Up Blue Day. Annually observed, this year’s event was a huge success with supporters around the world celebrating the day together. LIUB TYGESMany wore a blue article of clothing (bright royal blue is the official color for the National Autism Awareness Month); others trended autism support on social media by posting about it using the hashtag #LIUB; some changed their social media profile picture to have a filter related to Light It Up Blue; and others joined in by decorating and brightening up their homes, businesses, and global landmarks with blue lights. President Trump and First Lady Melania lit the exterior of the White House blue during the evening. Many other celebrities got into the spirit, too, by posting about it on social media (Justin Trudeau, Danny Trejo, SIA, Katie Couric, Holly Robinson Peete, Carole King, Tony Dovolani, and Bryce Dallas Howard to name a few). As much fun as the day is to celebrate, it has an important, more substantive goal: to raise awareness of autism spectrum disorder.  So I propose two questions:

“Why can’t every day be autism awareness day?

Why should “Light It Up Blue” for the whole month of April ONLY be in April?”

In my experience both with volunteering and recruiting for different organizations in the ABA Therapy field, I’ve found that individuals on the spectrum have the same needs, wants, and dreams as people who are not diagnosed with autism. By having an understanding of autism and intellectual disabilities in general, you can promote others’ understanding of it and aid those affected from it. liub2Instead of devoting our efforts to this goal one day a year, we need to educate others about autism every day.

While the hype of World Autism Awareness Day does raise awareness, the long term goal is to secure the inclusion and acceptance of individuals on the autism spectrum. These goals do not just begin and end in April.

We need to take an everyday approach, not a one day per year approach.

I personally love the enthusiasm that comes with dedicating April 2nd to educating people on Autism Spectrum Disorder but we need more autism advocates! So the next time that you put on the blue t-shirt you have laying around your closet, remember that you can and are being an advocate for someone with autism spectrum disorder regardless of what day of the year it is.

VICTORIAWorking as a recruiter in the ABA Therapy field is more than finding the best board certified behavior analysts in the country, it’s about being “all in” this movement to help others.  I welcome your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn and on Twitter. You can learn more about me HERE as I focus on helping those within the world of Autism. Learn more about TYGES on our website, Twitter, LinkedIn, and or on Facebook.

Our mission is simple:

“We’re here to make good things happen to other people.”

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March Madness & Hiring

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

It’s maddening!!!!!!!!!!!!!

March is a crazy time for college basketball and my wife tells my kids that I may be difficult to communicate with given it is my favorite time of year and my favorite sport to follow. march madness4

The funny thing is its not only madness in basketball but is seems to be a crazy time for hiring right now as well. Whatever your political affiliation is, the new administration, along with many other things are driving confidence in to the markets as evidenced by the DOW crossing of 20,000 a month or so ago. I would argue that all of this is artificial but it does drive spending by consumers that drives sales by companies that drives purchasing by companies and hiring of people. It’s a cycle where capitalism is at its best.

One of the companies that the stock guru’s like to follow is Parker Hannifin Corporation based in Ohio. They make motion and control systems used in a broad set of aerospace & industrial businesses. march madness5They credit Parker’s work over the past few years in the areas of “cost containment” and putting themselves in a position to grow when the time is right. They controlled costs in the flatter season and even built a cash reserve that has allowed them to recently announce the acquisition of Clarcor (filtration manufacturer) which will drive a new revenue stream for PH. The original article can be found HERE.

Why do I share this information on Parker Hannifin and what does it have to do with Basketball? While Parker and for that matter other companies in the Industrial B2B space are seeing benefits of their hard work over the past few years, the real question is:

“Do they have the Talent to deal with the next few years as confidence (artificial or not) grows and more relevant people leave the workforce (primarily baby boomers)?”

Parker has 354 openings on their website and I’m sure this is just a fraction of what they really need. As a Industrial B2B recruiter, we had a record year last year and are on track to do it again this year. march madness3

The challenge is not finding the open orders but rather finding and convincing the talent to leave their organization for a new role.

If you are in a hiring capacity here are a four things to consider as we go further in to 2017:

  • Cost – Talent is going to cost you more – the concept of internal equity needs to be tossed out the window. It is no longer relevant.
  • Better Processes – You’re going to need to speed up the process on your side if you are the employer. The best talent has no interest in going to work for a slow moving and indecisive company.
  • Focus on your existing team – You’re going to see turnover increase (mostly voluntary) as the full-court press is coming. People that have been passed over for promotions or given measly raises are now getting called about jobs that are a step up in title, responsibility and compensation (some 20+% increases).
  • Better, not perfect – If you’re looking for the “perfect” individual with a stellar work history plan on not finding them. Stellar histories have faded in the past decade and it’s not the individual’s fault but rather the company in my opinion. We have a saying – “Don’t let perfection get in the way of getting better.”

I could go on and on but you get the point. The reality of it is it may look like good times ahead but it will be maddening to say the least in the next couple of years as companies jockey for the same Talent. It will also be fun to watch. As will be the Basketball – Enjoy.

This is just one man’s opinion. I would appreciate your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Budget Approved. Now what?

Written by:  Matt Dionne, Managing Partner TYGES Elite

budgetThis is the time of the year when most business leaders have their budgets approved and are now reviewing last month’s progress toward their new annual goals. Many leaders will learn that the actual results are not achieving the year-to-date goals after just one or two months. “How can this be?” you might ask.

“How can we be off target so early in the year that has just begun.”

This can be due to a number of reasons including:

  • Poor Assumptions
  • Changes in Market Conditions
  • Unplanned Negative Events
  • Lack of Resources
  • Errors in budget modeling like linear budgeting without seasonal effects

However, sometimes budgeted results are missed due to ineffective actions which result from poor implementation and poor execution.

In my past, I have seen many business plans that were well designed with great actions. However, the execution of those actions did not deliver the expected results. Often this was due to the lack of initiative, foresight, planning, urgency or skill set from those responsible for the actions.  As leaders, we focus on the why, what, when, and how much to spend on the planned actions.  invest5However, we do not spend enough time on who will be doing the actions and do they have the leadership, experience, and skill set for the planned actions.

Improving results dependent on people requires an investment in people.

Such investments include reassigning your best employees to new roles, providing training to those in the roles, or acquiring the required talent to drive the new actions.  Having the leadership talent to achieve planned improvements is something equally important to the actions themselves and deserves more time and planning.

So, as you review your business results to your budgeted plans, ask yourself if you have the leadership talent to achieve your planned success. If not, it’s time to take action on WHO will be driving your business actions.

I encourage your feedback and would enjoy the opportunity to provide you the resources for a top tier performing team.  You can find me on LinkedIn and you can learn more about my team and company here.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES by following us on Twitter @TYGESInt or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Achieve Your Goals with 3 Steps

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Commercial Growth

Why is it that some people just have goals and other’s obtain them?  What if their secret to success is simple?  It is…if you follow these 3 Steps.

Your goal is just a dream or vision if it isn’t written down.  A written goal is like a destination that you want to go to; but, you haven’t been there before.

The power of a writing down your goals is bigger than you think.  warningI read a great book by Tony J. Hughes called The Joshua Principle.  It cited a study from a graduation class that only 3% of students had specific written goals at graduation.  When these graduates were surveyed twenty years later, this minority (3%) made more money than the other 97% combined.

Step One is to write down your goals.  Once that is completed, two things usually happen.  One, the excitement will kick in and you will more than likely jump straight to Step Three and GO or two, you will do nothing at all.  Don’t make these mistakes. To use a driving analogy, let’s say you are in your car and you want to get to a destination that you haven’t been to before.  First, you would obtain a physical address and type it into your GPS or let Siri know where you wanted to go.  To take some words from the group Clash, “Should I STAY or should I GO now?”  What’s your answer:

ANSWER:  STAY

So, your in your car, GPS set…what if you just sit there, engine running, with your car in park?

I realize that this doesn’t make any sense.  But seriously, have you ever had a goal that you didn’t start to do what was necessary to obtain it?  Today? 2017? 2016? 2015? 2014?   If we’re honest with ourselves, it is no different than sitting in a running car, GPS set, and our gear in park.

Everything you need, just no driver.

ANSWER:  GO

Why do so many people veer off the course at this point and fail to obtain their goals?

To keep with the driving analogy.  Now your car is in drive and you are making “progress” toward your destination (written goal).   Once the destination (goal) is set, your GPS or mobile device is ready to give you directions, step by step, to your set destination (goal).
car-shoulderPerhaps, your car is out of line or doesn’t have enough gas…meaning, even though you are trying to drive toward your goal, which is commendable, your car keeps wanting to veer off course or worse yet, run out of gas.  Your car needs a simple alignment and a full tank.  In our case, we might need some time to think things out, create a detailed plan, and get some help, guidance, knowledge, or other resources to keep us from veering off course and stay aligned to our goal(s).  Not only will it take less effort in the long run, it will get you there with less wear-and-tear on your car (you).

OK, so what is the Second Step?

failure-jordan2In my opinion, failure is not a bad thing, at least an effort is being made to get to your goal.  Failure is just one step towards your success.  On top of that, valuable things will be learned along the way.  I believe that we fall short of our goals because we leave out Step Two all to often.

Before you jump in the car and go, you need to do Step Two and ask yourself three questions:  #1 Why?  #2 When?  #3 How?

These three questions are vital as they fuel your passion providing motivation (WHY), set a timeline/deadline (WHEN), and create a well thought out plan and/or establish needs/resources (HOW).

Don’t miss this…Step Two is the hardest and most important step.  

Let’s keep with the driving analogy and set our destination(goal) for a new restaurant we have been wanting to try out.  How could we fail at such a simple goal?  Well…to keep things simple, perhaps you “really” aren’t hungry (WHY), or you missed your reservation time and they’re booked up when you arrive (WHEN), or you left the house without your wallet (HOW).  All three areas (questions) need to be aligned for your goal(s) to be obtained.

These tips will help you on your current journey to obtain your goals.  If you haven’t set your goals just yet, no worries.  The great thing about setting written goals, they can be set at any time.  It doesn’t have to be done when a new year arrives.  If you want to make something better or obtain something great, take these three simple steps:

Step One – Write down your goal(s).

Step Two – Ask yourself/team three questions: Why? When? How?

Step Three – Go!

One last thought…nothing great really happens by accident or is going to show up at your doorstep.  Extraordinary things, take extraordinary people, with extraordinary effort. We are all capable of being extraordinary, it’s a choice.  Bottom line…the secret to success is you.  Good luck!

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at https://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Clarity & the New England Patriots – what do they have in common?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Let me start this conversation by saying I’m not a Patriots fan. In fact, they are considered the enemy to my lowly Miami Dolphins who have brought nothing but disappointment for two decades running. While the Patriots may be the enemy I have an enormous amount of respect for the leadership and their process. patriots5Yes, they’ve been criticized over the years for filming others practices, deflating footballs, etc. but the reality is their leadership has built a culture of excellence for two decades running. I remember when Drew Bledsoe went down in the second game in 2001 with an injury. My first thought was ouch – my second thought was we may have a shot with Bledsoe gone because they are putting in this unknown quarterback drafted in the 6th round from Michigan named Tom Brady. Even after starting the year 0-2, this no-name steps up and carries them to the Super Bowl Championship and the end of the Drew Bledsoe era.

Earlier this year, Brady was suspended for the first four games of the regular season, up steps the #2 quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo (who?) and they win their first two games. He gets injured in game two and up steps the #3 quarterback Jacoby Brissett (who?) and they go 1 – 1 with him. Tom Brady comes back in game 5 and wins. Now they are 5-1 and arguably one of the strongest teams in the NFL.

So what is it they have that allows them to keep performing at a high level regardless of injuries, distractions (think Aaron Hernandez), etc.? 

The conversation above is centered around quarterbacks but reality is they’ve had injuries and distractions across the board but for some reason they keep winning. The Pats have 124 wins over the past decade (#1 in the NFL and 20 more than the second team – Indianapolis). It starts with Leadership – Robert Kraft at the helm of the Patriots and his head coach Bill Belichick who joined the Pats in 2000. patriots3These two gentlemen are the clear leaders (not the players). They have established a culture of team first and have put a system in place where average players perform way above their individual capability. Tom Brady is a great quarterback because he plays within the New England Patriots system. Could he play elsewhere? Yes he could but the question is whether he would be as effective. I highly doubt it.

So what is it they have? 1) Clear leadership – Kraft & Belichick 2) Clear Systems & Processes 3) Clear Culture – you join the patriots they don’t join you 4) Clear role definition – everyone has a role to play. Yes they have talent but it’s the talent that fits their culture & their schemes – not the other way around. Corporations talk about talent like it’s the magic recipe to fixing everything. patriots4It doesn’t hurt to have talent on the team but without Clarity of Leadership, Systems, Processes, Culture, & Role Definition, it is pretty hard to be win as a team.

I’d appreciate your thoughts even if you don’t like football.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Trifecta – Make yourself more attractive to Hiring Managers

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

Recruiters spend a lot of time working to find that perfect person who fits a very narrow set of criteria and has the intangibles that make them a good fit with the client. I’m constantly evaluating people based on their work experience, industry experience, location preferences and a host of other things that may or may not be evident by a simple resume perusal.

I remember seeing this chart in a presentation a while back and I even drew a little picture of it in my notebook that I have hanging on the wall in my office.  Many times when I am debating whether someone’s level of fit to a particular position I find myself using this criteria as a guide. I call it The Trifecta.

The Trifecta is a Venn Diagram that describes, in very simple terms, the level of fit that a particular person may or may not possess when it comes to a position I am recruiting.

Let me break it down for you.

There are 3 circles here that each represent some attributes for the particular candidate or job. Skills, Geography & Industry.

  • Skills represent the required experience or skillset that this person must have to be qualified for the role. This might be Education, Experiential or even Knowledge based skills. An example might be someone who has led a lean transformation from the corporate level.
  • Geography is pretty straightforward. It essentially means that the person or job where the role is located is a good fit. Ideally this would be local and within commuting distance but it could also be in a place that is highly desirable for some reason. Maybe it is a virtual role.
  • The final circle is Industry. In the ideal situation the individual or position fits well with the industry background.

Now comes the scoring part of the diagram. As you can see, there are numbers 1, 2, and 3 on the chart.

  • 3 represents a fit for both skills & geography but not industry. This is the least desirable situation as the person might be a good fit based on experience and they are in the right place but they lack experience in that industry. We can’t change this because the person either has it or they don’t.
  • 2 represents a fit for both skills and industry. This is better than 3 because we can do something to change this.  Ex – We can relocate the individual to the location where the job needs them to be.
  • 1 is The Trifecta. The individual has the skills, industry experience and is located in the right geography. This is what we are looking for in the perfect world.

What does this mean for you as a Job Seeker or Hiring Authority?

As a Job Seeker, try to find positions where you meet The Trifecta. This means that you are local, meet the skills requirements and also have experience in the industry. In the popular vernacular this is a “no brainer” for the person who receives your resume. You’ll get an interview, which is what you are after.

As a Hiring Authority, this means that you are screening for skills, industry & geography as you scan resumes and talk with potential candidates. Clearly those who bring The Trifecta are your ideal fit and you can focus on confirming that the cultural fit is there in the interview process.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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8 Ways to Help a Recruiter Find a New Role for You

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

I often talk to candidates who have worked diligently to find a new role but have failed time and time again to find something suitable. Often, they have interviewed several times only to come in second. It amazes me that these same candidates expect a recruiter to able to wave his or her magic wand and get them in front of a dozen great companies who are hiring. choices3Let me be honest with you: I do not have a magic wand and I do not know any recruiter who has one either. I do know that finding a new role is tough and is made even more so by those who will not help themselves.

Having said this, I have some ideas for those who work with recruiters that will maximize the value you receive from that relationship.

  1. Treat the recruiter like the valuable resource they are. Be honest and open with them about what you want to do and where you want to go. Help them form a clear picture of what you want.
  2. Time kills all deals. Never waste the recruiter’s time by professing to have interest in a role when you really don’t. Make sure you do your due diligence and then pursue the role with all of your energy.
  3. No surprises. Be open with them about everything. This includes the good, the bad, and the ugly. Don’t set the recruiter up to fail by withholding information about why you left your previous job, etc.
  4. Follow the recruiter’s advice in all things related to the job search. Remember, this person makes a living finding people like you a job. When the recruiter tells you not to discuss something with the hiring authority, then don’t. If you are unclear on what you should or should not discuss, then ask.
  5. Get organized. Know what companies have been given your credentials in the past. Don’t set the recruiter up to give a company a resume that is already on file.
  6. Prep. Prep. Prep. When you go into an interview, you should know everything publicly available about the company and the role. Who are the decision makers? What are they looking for in a candidate? Why have others done poorly in interviews? Get all the information you can from the recruiter about these things so that you can prepare for them.
  7. Process is key. If you are unclear about the recruiter’s process or the company’s hiring process, then ask for clarification. Make sure you do what you say you are going to do when you said you would do it.
  8. Check in on a regular basis. Even if have not heard from the recruiter, you can certainly call or email once every week or so with an update. Nothing keeps your name on someone’s lips like regular communication.

So that’s it.

Help us to help you.

A recruiter can get you into an interview, but it’s up to you to get the call back by showing them what you’re made of when the time comes.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Behavioral Interviewing — Why So Scary?

Written by: Steve Sanders- VP/GM of Industrial Practice

If there are two words in the English language that strike fear in the heart of a Job Seeker more than “Behavioral Interview” then I am not aware of them. I prep people for interviews daily and just the mention of this type of interview creates a palpable sense of fear that I can feel over the phone. It is surprising because of all the things I would want to talk about as a potential employee actual situations where I made a tangible impact are at the top of my list. I thought it would be helpful to provide some quick pointers for those who are preparing for the dreaded Behavioral Interview.
Essentially, a Behavioral Interview entails asking questions and seeking responses that are illustrative of the interviewee’s past behaviors. Ideally, an interviewee will answer these Behavior Interviewing 2question in a specific format defined as the “STAR” format.

• Situation – What was the challenge you were facing?
• Task – What did you need to accomplish to overcome the challenge?
• Action – What course of action did you follow?
• Result – What happened as a result?

It makes sense that the interviewer will be looking at your resume during the interview so I would encourage you to begin your prep work here. As part of your prep work consider each title/position listed on your resume and provide a written answer to these two questions.

1.) Make a short list of your most relevant accomplishments or achievements while working in this position.

What did you Make, Save or Improve during your time here?

2.) For each accomplishment/achievement you identified in #1, provide a brief explanation of the strategy you employed and the implementation process you used to get to the end result.

Now organize these into bullet points that you can refer to on an interview cheat sheet during your call or meeting. The cheat sheet should follow along with your resume in terms of timeline by title and position. As you prepare for the interview review these bullets and be ready to share them with the interviewer as they come up in the discussion.

That’s it really. I see no reason to be fearful if you have a good plan to address the questions in the way the interviewer prefers to ask them then you should be in a position to give a good accounting of your past behaviors.

If you need other ideas about how to prepare for various interviews then check out our online REFERENCE GUIDE.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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