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March Madness & Hiring

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

It’s maddening!!!!!!!!!!!!!

March is a crazy time for college basketball and my wife tells my kids that I may be difficult to communicate with given it is my favorite time of year and my favorite sport to follow. march madness4

The funny thing is its not only madness in basketball but is seems to be a crazy time for hiring right now as well. Whatever your political affiliation is, the new administration, along with many other things are driving confidence in to the markets as evidenced by the DOW crossing of 20,000 a month or so ago. I would argue that all of this is artificial but it does drive spending by consumers that drives sales by companies that drives purchasing by companies and hiring of people. It’s a cycle where capitalism is at its best.

One of the companies that the stock guru’s like to follow is Parker Hannifin Corporation based in Ohio. They make motion and control systems used in a broad set of aerospace & industrial businesses. march madness5They credit Parker’s work over the past few years in the areas of “cost containment” and putting themselves in a position to grow when the time is right. They controlled costs in the flatter season and even built a cash reserve that has allowed them to recently announce the acquisition of Clarcor (filtration manufacturer) which will drive a new revenue stream for PH. The original article can be found HERE.

Why do I share this information on Parker Hannifin and what does it have to do with Basketball? While Parker and for that matter other companies in the Industrial B2B space are seeing benefits of their hard work over the past few years, the real question is:

“Do they have the Talent to deal with the next few years as confidence (artificial or not) grows and more relevant people leave the workforce (primarily baby boomers)?”

Parker has 354 openings on their website and I’m sure this is just a fraction of what they really need. As a Industrial B2B recruiter, we had a record year last year and are on track to do it again this year. march madness3

The challenge is not finding the open orders but rather finding and convincing the talent to leave their organization for a new role.

If you are in a hiring capacity here are a four things to consider as we go further in to 2017:

  • Cost – Talent is going to cost you more – the concept of internal equity needs to be tossed out the window. It is no longer relevant.
  • Better Processes – You’re going to need to speed up the process on your side if you are the employer. The best talent has no interest in going to work for a slow moving and indecisive company.
  • Focus on your existing team – You’re going to see turnover increase (mostly voluntary) as the full-court press is coming. People that have been passed over for promotions or given measly raises are now getting called about jobs that are a step up in title, responsibility and compensation (some 20+% increases).
  • Better, not perfect – If you’re looking for the “perfect” individual with a stellar work history plan on not finding them. Stellar histories have faded in the past decade and it’s not the individual’s fault but rather the company in my opinion. We have a saying – “Don’t let perfection get in the way of getting better.”

I could go on and on but you get the point. The reality of it is it may look like good times ahead but it will be maddening to say the least in the next couple of years as companies jockey for the same Talent. It will also be fun to watch. As will be the Basketball – Enjoy.

This is just one man’s opinion. I would appreciate your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Cost of Turnover

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

I received a number of emails regarding January’s write-up on a “best-in-class” company called Danaher. You can read can find this blog by “clicking here” in case you missed it. One of the emails I received was from a TYGES friend who is also a former Danaher leader himself. I’m taking some editorial rights with his response to keep it short and to the point but I wanted to capture the essence of his note:

“Good thought put into this one. Yes, Danaher does try to continue to build bench strength throughout the organization. They actually have a CVD (Core Value Driver) to measure voluntary turnover (people leaving the organization that Danaher didn’t want them to leave). Larry Culp helped develop these CVDs before he left to help filter out the most important metrics for the organization. Tom Joyce (Culp’s replacement) helped develop the new Vision for the company “Helping Realize Life’s Potential”. potentialThis is fantastic when you break each word down to understand how powerful it is. Of course there are tradeoff’s as the DBS culture pushes people and it is difficult to find the quality of life balance.”

So as we think about the cost of talent, how do we get the attention of senior leadership within a company to try and understand the “Opportunity Cost” of having an opening. I scoured the internet as I’m sure there are a number of people who have built financial models that show this number. I read quite a few articles but found this one excerpt from an article written in April 2015 by Karlyn Borysenko who states:

“But regardless of the reason, what this information exposes is a fundamental lack of understanding about what turnover really costs an organization. When you consider all of the costs associated with employee turnover – including interviewing, hiring, training, reduced productivity, lost opportunity costs, etc. – here’s what it really costs an organization.”

  • Entry-Level Employees – it costs between 30-50 percent of their annual salary to replace them.
  • Mid-Level Employees – it costs upwards of 150 percent of their annual salary to replace them.
  • High-Level or Highly Specialized Employees – you’re looking at 400 percent of their annual salary.

money2Let’s look at it this way and play a game called “Fun With Math.” For the a simple example, let’s assume that a business loses 12 employees in one year, averaging one per month.

  • Six of these employees were entry level, with an average salary of $40,000. It costs, on average, $16,000 to replace each employee at 40 percent of their annual salary, for $96,000 total
  • Four of these employees were mid-level, with an average salary of $80,000. It costs, on average, $120,000 to replace each employee at 150 percent of their annual salary, for $480,000 total.
  • Two of these employees were senior, with an average salary of $120,000. At 400 percent of their annual salary to replace them, you’re looking at almost $1 million, specifically $960,000.

Add everything up and you’re looking at costs of over $1.5 million to replace just 12 employees.

Numbers seem high? Fair enough – there are organizations that estimate replacement costs to be lower. So let’s cut the cost of replacing all of those employees to the lower end of what it costs to replace an entry-level employee – 30 percent – across the board. Here’s how it breaks down:

  • It’s going to cost your company $72,000 to replace the six entry-level employees.
  • It’s going to cost your company $96,000 to replace your four mid-level employees.
  • It’s going to cost your company $72,000 to replace the two senior employees.

That means that at the absolute lowest estimated end of the spectrum – your best case scenario – you are looking at almost $250,000 as the cost of the turnover of just 12 employees.  

money4If your company has a quarter of a million dollars that it can just light on fire at the next office BBQ social activity, then maybe you don’t really need to invest in these areas. But my guess is that the vast majority of companies are simply not in that position.  It costs less to retain than it does to replace.
You can argue with the math or even the thought process but one thing I’ve learned is once a position is “officially” opened it’s already too late and mark my words when I say this: You cannot replace the person who left with a new person at the same rate especially if you’re looking for the best talent. The concept of “internal equity” is a joke. We need to be thinking “market rate” at this point. The best talent cost’s more.

This is just one man’s opinion. I would appreciate your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Budget Approved. Now what?

Written by:  Matt Dionne, Managing Partner TYGES Elite

budgetThis is the time of the year when most business leaders have their budgets approved and are now reviewing last month’s progress toward their new annual goals. Many leaders will learn that the actual results are not achieving the year-to-date goals after just one or two months. “How can this be?” you might ask.

“How can we be off target so early in the year that has just begun.”

This can be due to a number of reasons including:

  • Poor Assumptions
  • Changes in Market Conditions
  • Unplanned Negative Events
  • Lack of Resources
  • Errors in budget modeling like linear budgeting without seasonal effects

However, sometimes budgeted results are missed due to ineffective actions which result from poor implementation and poor execution.

In my past, I have seen many business plans that were well designed with great actions. However, the execution of those actions did not deliver the expected results. Often this was due to the lack of initiative, foresight, planning, urgency or skill set from those responsible for the actions.  As leaders, we focus on the why, what, when, and how much to spend on the planned actions.  invest5However, we do not spend enough time on who will be doing the actions and do they have the leadership, experience, and skill set for the planned actions.

Improving results dependent on people requires an investment in people.

Such investments include reassigning your best employees to new roles, providing training to those in the roles, or acquiring the required talent to drive the new actions.  Having the leadership talent to achieve planned improvements is something equally important to the actions themselves and deserves more time and planning.

So, as you review your business results to your budgeted plans, ask yourself if you have the leadership talent to achieve your planned success. If not, it’s time to take action on WHO will be driving your business actions.

I encourage your feedback and would enjoy the opportunity to provide you the resources for a top tier performing team.  You can find me on LinkedIn and you can learn more about my team and company here.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES by following us on Twitter @TYGESInt or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Where have all the candidates gone?

Written by:  Katrina Blalock, VPGM of Aerospace & Defense Practice

Throughout my recruiting years, I’ve noticed that qualified and interested candidates are becoming harder and harder to find. I’ve often wondered,

“Are employers being too picky or not paying enough for talent?”

Purple Squirrel is a term used in the recruiting industry to describe the type of candidate that is a rare find. purple-squirrelToo often, employers will present recruiters with a wish list of educational, work history and skill-sets that radically limit the candidate pool. Employers should be mindful that each condition placed upon a job description exponentially shrinks the candidate pool. In developing job criteria, employers should be mindful that they are excluding good candidates based on pinpoints of a job requisition.

After finding the right candidate, are employers paying competitive market value?

In high school physics, we learned the Law of Inertia (i.e. objects at rest tend to stay at rest unless acted upon by a force). Candidates are similar as inertia to change jobs or companies does not exist. Over time, prospective employers have forgotten this universal principle when offering a compensation package to a candidate. no-thanksSimply put, qualified candidates will rarely change jobs for the same money they are making at their present employment. Employers, it’s time to “come off of the hip” and make it worthwhile for the “Purple Squirrel” to leave his or her job and come work for you.

Unnecessary job criteria and average compensation packages have created the illusion of a candidate shortage. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Where have all of the candidates gone?  They may be right under your nose!  

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Key to Avoiding Talent Problems

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

As we begin 2017, I find myself having numerous conversations with clients regarding their talent problems. talent6We did a five part series last year on this subject, here they are Part I, II, III, IV, & V.

Today, I want to focus on a pretty amazing company that understands talent and it has shown up in their financial results year over year for the past couple of decades – Danaher. For the average person, they won’t recognize the Danaher name. It is a publicly traded holding company with a number of different brands/products throughout its portfolio that grew from a small $700 million company in the 90’s to nearly $20 billion in recent years using their “secret sauce” – the DBS (Danaher Business System) which is modeled after the Toyota Production System (TPS) but with many enhancements in my opinion. Last year they split the company in to two companies (Danaher & Fortive) to help focus them in particular areas. Regardless of the split, they will continue forward with the DBS model and it will show up in their performance.

Many articles have been written about Danaher so my intent is not to replicate them but rather I want to focus on what I see as one of their key ingredients to the DBS success – how they handle talent. While this is not the end all be all, this is where I see they have a distinct edge over their peer group of companies as well as the many companies out there trying to emulate/duplicate their DBS model and ultimately their success. Here’s what I’ve seen:

They have a farm system (think baseball) where they consistently hire new college graduates (undergrads and their coveted new MBA graduate program where they recruit from the top 10 programs in the US). talent4Regardless of what’s happening with their market / businesses they’re committed to hiring the brightest & the best and they tend to pay them to the right of the bell curve – meaning they pay well. For the high potential MBA’s, they put them in a rotation program where they garner experience in commercial roles, operational roles, and strategy roles ultimately letting the “cream of the crop” rise to the top and become their GM’s/Presidents.

The key here is they are not necessarily filling open requisitions that were created by someone who left the organization.

They in fact are over hiring to keep building their “bench strength.” Very few companies do this as consistently or well as Danaher. Most companies try to run lean and wait for someone to resign. This is a huge mistake in my opinion because whether you move a person internally or make an external hire there is so much opportunity cost being left on the table due to lost leadership and productivity. This is something that most presidents don’t truly grasp. They get it conceptually but do nothing to build their bench strength. I equate it to orders are flowing in from your customers and you are out of stock – lost opportunity. Something you never get back.

What’s amazing to me is this is all a math equation. Companies have an idea of their turnover % each year, they know the ages of their employees, and they have a projection of the headcount they will need to complete the goals for the year. talent3They can also pretty easily figure out the trends for what types of roles are turning over and build bench around these specific roles. I can tell you the patterns of my clients and I don’t have all their data.

So why am I sharing this today?

To get you to think of talent as a real investment – not a short range transaction. Consider putting together a Sales Operation Planning process around talent and get serious and intentional about finally getting ahead of the game in your talent pipeline. If you have not figured it out, this is only going to get worse for everyone as company tenures are shrinking, loyalty to companies is all but gone, and people are getting recruited out for bigger jobs, bigger titles, and bigger money. If your average turnover was 5% last year, expect it to rise. If you choose to do nothing, expect tough times in the future as you won’t have the talent you need when you need it. It’s time for leaders to step up and do something about talent instead of blaming others. This is a leadership problem to solve.

I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion.   You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Tony Romo Demonstrates Leadership – The Essence of Meritocracy

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

With all that has been happening over the past month relative to politics I thought would share something that struck me this week as a proper approach to dealing with a difficult situation. Hard to believe I’m talking about Tony Romo – For those of you that do not follow football – he is or was the quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys for the past decade. He took the helm from Drew Bledsoe (if you remember from our last write up he was the QB displaced by Tom Brady in New England). Tony Romo is a guy who has been plagued with injuriesromo2 over his career and seemed to be the leader of a team that always fell short of their expectations. Well, earlier this year, Tony Romo was injured again and they had to turn to rookie QB Dak Prescott who was unproven. Fast forward to today and Dak has led the team to 9 wins & 1 loss while Tony Romo has been healing. He has brought leadership and hope to this organization. For the past 6 weeks the media has been trying to drive a wedge into the Cowboys organization by questioning who would be the QB when Tony Romo came back.

Tony Romo addressed it in a 6 minute press conference this week – It’s worth the WATCH

I’ve never been a fan but I have a new found respect for Tony Romo who demonstrated true leadership, what it means to be humble, and sharing with people what I believe is a true failure in our society today. He shared that professional football is a meritocracy. What is meritocracy – According to Wikipedia: “it is a political philosophy holding that power should be vested in individuals almost exclusively based on ability and talent.romo3 Advancement in such a system is based on performance measured through examination and/or demonstrated achievement in the field where it is implemented.” He goes on to say that you have to earn it each and every week in the NFL.

My question is, “What if we all took that approach and attitude in life?”

Yes we should be recognized for what we did yesterday but we should never expect to be given something for nothing. We have to come out each day and bring the best attitude & effort we can and EARN what we want. Instead, over the last decade our society seems to be moving steadily toward one where people expect something for nothing. In a sense, welfare. Don’t get me wrong, I believe there are people that need to be helped and we are called to help them but we need to not only give to them but to walk with them and help them get on their own feet. There will always be people that will need assistance (some short-term & some long-term) and it is our responsibility to care for them. The people I’m talking about are the ones that think the world/their family/society/the government/their employer owes them something. You are not owed anything except the wonderful opportunity to get out of bed each day and make a choice on what you will do with your day.

So I end this month’s write-up with a tip of the hat to Mr. Romo. romo4Thank you for taking time to share this with everyone.

This is just one man’s opinion and I’d appreciate your thoughts.

PS – it’s great time of year to stop, reflect and remember to be thankful. While things may seem insurmountable at times, be thankful for the small things. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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Integrated Talent Chain – Part III

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

As a follow up to our series over the past couple of months, this is Part III (Part I, Part II)  in our series evaluating what it takes to put a true Integrated Talent Chain in place and make it a competitive weapon for your company.  Now that we have an understanding of current inventory and forecasted needs as well as turnover, let’s talk about what it takes to attract talent.

Question 1 – Do you have an Employment Brand?

What exactly does this mean? I boil it down to this one statement – it is why people come to work for your company and ultimately why they stay.  what is employee brandingThey may not stay forever but there is something that attracted them. A fancy brand, cool products, great giveaways, a specific location, the opportunities, the career pathing, the industry, etc. These are all examples of why people join companies and defining what is very unique about your company is important in defining who you are. A good place to start is a clear Mission that is meaningful and impactful to a person’s life. Talk about what you are trying to do as a company – your Vision. Make sure people understand your Core Values & Beliefs. From there you can then decipher the answer to your Employment Brand and learn how to share it appropriately. My warning to you is a cool product is not the answer; free coffee is not the answer; ping pong is not the answer – it is something much more impactful that stands the test of time. Yes it will be tweaked as time progresses but the core of who you are should not. This can be a very challenging exercise to go through as you have to get in touch with what is really the purpose of your business.

Question 2 – Do you have a clear Talent Acquisition Process?

You want to frustrate high potential talent, have an unclear, ever changing process with no repeatability and no speed. This is where most companies fail miserably. First their posture is to start from an arrogant perspective (my opinion) where they believe the talent will wait on them and they need to demonstrate their value to the company only when in reality when you are pursuing high potential talent it’s always a two way process. 1 way 2 wayHere’s my position on the process:

  • It should be well defined using standard work such that wherever a person interviews in the world they will have the same experience
  • Right up front – when you first speak to the individual, layout the process and make it very clear to them what they should expect as it pertains to steps & timeline. I can only think of one client in our lineup that I can honestly say does a good job of this. Most companies miss this mark.
  • As part of the process it needs to be swift and decisive. If the process is well documented up front, you can move people through the process at a good pace and make a decisive yes or no – if it’s a maybe it’s a no. I have heard the term “keep them warm” over a 100 times in my career – this is a joke. When I hear this I tell the individual to move on.
  • Don’t start the process unless you have preauthorization to hire someone. It’s a waste of time to get someone to the final stage of the interviews only to put them in a holding pattern while you run it up the presumable ladder for approval. This should be a foregone conclusion that you can hire this person. World class is the person leaves your building with an offer in hand. I’ve seen a lot of this 1 up process instilled over the years where the hiring manager is required to interview the person and weigh in on the decision. This is a failure as you are not fixing the process but rather inspecting every product.
  • If more than a few people have to interview the person like the boss’s boss as an example you have the wrong leader in the hiring capacity – replace them or replace yourself.
  • Don’t let perfection get in the way of getting better. There is no perfect person out there. Your focus should be on the journey at hand which is getting better daily.

Question 3 – Do you have the capacity to recruit & develop talent?

Recruiting good talent is difficult. It’s not about finding a resume online or a LinkedIn profile that’s looks good that makes it difficult. It’s a courting process just like it would be looking for a lifelong partner. It takes a lot work to source, call, qualify, recruit, attract and get the person on-boarded. When I hear an internal recruiter tell me they are personally working 20+ jobs at the same time, it’s a recipe for disaster. HelpIn my office, we estimate that a professional recruiter (working 50 hours/week) can work between 4-7 orders at any given time and actually have an impact. Especially given the amount of non-value added things that have been added to the process with applicant tracking systems, etc. I feel bad for most internal recruiters because of the unrealistic expectations put on them. If you’re going to get serious about recruiting you need to have the proper capacity with the proper tools and skills to be successful.

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? I’m talking about a formal Talent Development process in which I will discuss in Part 4.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback on anything. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.   You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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The Trifecta – Make yourself more attractive to Hiring Managers

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

Recruiters spend a lot of time working to find that perfect person who fits a very narrow set of criteria and has the intangibles that make them a good fit with the client. I’m constantly evaluating people based on their work experience, industry experience, location preferences and a host of other things that may or may not be evident by a simple resume perusal.

I remember seeing this chart in a presentation a while back and I even drew a little picture of it in my notebook that I have hanging on the wall in my office.  Many times when I am debating whether someone’s level of fit to a particular position I find myself using this criteria as a guide. I call it The Trifecta.

The Trifecta is a Venn Diagram that describes, in very simple terms, the level of fit that a particular person may or may not possess when it comes to a position I am recruiting.

Let me break it down for you.

There are 3 circles here that each represent some attributes for the particular candidate or job. Skills, Geography & Industry.

  • Skills represent the required experience or skillset that this person must have to be qualified for the role. This might be Education, Experiential or even Knowledge based skills. An example might be someone who has led a lean transformation from the corporate level.
  • Geography is pretty straightforward. It essentially means that the person or job where the role is located is a good fit. Ideally this would be local and within commuting distance but it could also be in a place that is highly desirable for some reason. Maybe it is a virtual role.
  • The final circle is Industry. In the ideal situation the individual or position fits well with the industry background.

Now comes the scoring part of the diagram. As you can see, there are numbers 1, 2, and 3 on the chart.

  • 3 represents a fit for both skills & geography but not industry. This is the least desirable situation as the person might be a good fit based on experience and they are in the right place but they lack experience in that industry. We can’t change this because the person either has it or they don’t.
  • 2 represents a fit for both skills and industry. This is better than 3 because we can do something to change this.  Ex – We can relocate the individual to the location where the job needs them to be.
  • 1 is The Trifecta. The individual has the skills, industry experience and is located in the right geography. This is what we are looking for in the perfect world.

What does this mean for you as a Job Seeker or Hiring Authority?

As a Job Seeker, try to find positions where you meet The Trifecta. This means that you are local, meet the skills requirements and also have experience in the industry. In the popular vernacular this is a “no brainer” for the person who receives your resume. You’ll get an interview, which is what you are after.

As a Hiring Authority, this means that you are screening for skills, industry & geography as you scan resumes and talk with potential candidates. Clearly those who bring The Trifecta are your ideal fit and you can focus on confirming that the cultural fit is there in the interview process.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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