Posted on Leave a comment

Ingredients of a Great Company

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Commercial Growth

When you think of a great company, WHAT stands out? In other words, what do you see or feel?Success Story Cover

  • A creative logo?
  • A simple well written mission statement?
  • Employee friendly offices?
  • Interactive/Intuitive Website?
  • A uniquely impressive product/service/process?
  • A giving back philosophy…locally and/or abroad?

We could all agree these are some of the important things for a great company to possess. However, a better question to ask ourselves would be:

When you think of a great company, WHO stands out?

Success Story5Let’s face it, any great company has incredible people that make it happen; regardless of what stands out in your user experience with that company. Somebody is behind it, someone’s Success Story.
Recently I had an exchange with a person that would meet that criteria. When she started just a short two and half years ago, she had no experience in the field at which she was pursuing. However, with a little hard work and utilizing a proven system…she is now on the #1 performing team in the company. When asked WHY she does what she does, she replied:

“There are many things I love about my job. The one thing that sticks out the most though is the ability to help someone better their career. This in turn will hopefully better their lives and that of their family’s lives as well.”

Let me introduce you to Pamela Webster. PamelaHer focus is recruiting top level talent within the Sales & Marketing sector of the Industrial Manufacturing B2B space for companies like Stanley Black & Decker, Crane, Idex, Filtration Group, Belden, Pulsafeeder, & Optical Cable Corporation just to name a few. All of these companies impact our world’s infrastructure in some way…some of the names you’ve heard of, others perhaps not; yet, they all make the products that we take for granted everyday. In her experience, she has been complimented quite a bit on her company’s process and how we operate as a recruiting firm. Pam explained one such story:

“Last year, we placed on individual with a client of ours based in Massachusetts. She really enjoyed our process from the initial conversation about the opportunity at hand, to the guidance received though the preliminary interview process. I only handled a small portion of the entire process. The Account Executive on my team then guided the individual through the final interview steps and the offer process. It was a wonderful match, and both the company and individual felt that it was a great experience.”

I see this time and time again when I focus on the traits of successful people. The recipe can have more ingredients; however, somewhere in the mix these two things always show up:

Humility & Passion

Every company goes through growing pains. These growing pains create needs, things like:

  • Scaling up production with existing sites and/or adding new plant(s) to meet customer demand
  • Building up teams to approach new markets and/or support current and future clients in a better way
  • Launching new systems to keep narrowing the technology gap making system’s safer, more efficient, while continuing to drive up quality in the pursuit of a better product/service for the end user
  • Replacing key individuals that may be retiring or moving on to other vital roles within the company

Once things like these are understood, then a strategy & plan can be implemented to strive toward the agreed upon solution.
Success Story2Pam’s “success story” doesn’t happen without finding solutions for the problems or needs that you and/or your company are facing right now. Pamela is part of team that has been successfully helping our clients for the past 15 years with over a 1,000+ placements because we genuinely want to see things through your perspective. I know Pamela would be happy to hear from you and eager to help you with your “Success Story.”

Perhaps you are looking for a new team to join, consider TYGES…be a part of our team or consider being a new “startup” office. We have successful and proven solutions for both.

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog at https://reinventingrecruiting.com/

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on Leave a comment

Key to Avoiding Talent Problems

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

As we begin 2017, I find myself having numerous conversations with clients regarding their talent problems. talent6We did a five part series last year on this subject, here they are Part I, II, III, IV, & V.

Today, I want to focus on a pretty amazing company that understands talent and it has shown up in their financial results year over year for the past couple of decades – Danaher. For the average person, they won’t recognize the Danaher name. It is a publicly traded holding company with a number of different brands/products throughout its portfolio that grew from a small $700 million company in the 90’s to nearly $20 billion in recent years using their “secret sauce” – the DBS (Danaher Business System) which is modeled after the Toyota Production System (TPS) but with many enhancements in my opinion. Last year they split the company in to two companies (Danaher & Fortive) to help focus them in particular areas. Regardless of the split, they will continue forward with the DBS model and it will show up in their performance.

Many articles have been written about Danaher so my intent is not to replicate them but rather I want to focus on what I see as one of their key ingredients to the DBS success – how they handle talent. While this is not the end all be all, this is where I see they have a distinct edge over their peer group of companies as well as the many companies out there trying to emulate/duplicate their DBS model and ultimately their success. Here’s what I’ve seen:

They have a farm system (think baseball) where they consistently hire new college graduates (undergrads and their coveted new MBA graduate program where they recruit from the top 10 programs in the US). talent4Regardless of what’s happening with their market / businesses they’re committed to hiring the brightest & the best and they tend to pay them to the right of the bell curve – meaning they pay well. For the high potential MBA’s, they put them in a rotation program where they garner experience in commercial roles, operational roles, and strategy roles ultimately letting the “cream of the crop” rise to the top and become their GM’s/Presidents.

The key here is they are not necessarily filling open requisitions that were created by someone who left the organization.

They in fact are over hiring to keep building their “bench strength.” Very few companies do this as consistently or well as Danaher. Most companies try to run lean and wait for someone to resign. This is a huge mistake in my opinion because whether you move a person internally or make an external hire there is so much opportunity cost being left on the table due to lost leadership and productivity. This is something that most presidents don’t truly grasp. They get it conceptually but do nothing to build their bench strength. I equate it to orders are flowing in from your customers and you are out of stock – lost opportunity. Something you never get back.

What’s amazing to me is this is all a math equation. Companies have an idea of their turnover % each year, they know the ages of their employees, and they have a projection of the headcount they will need to complete the goals for the year. talent3They can also pretty easily figure out the trends for what types of roles are turning over and build bench around these specific roles. I can tell you the patterns of my clients and I don’t have all their data.

So why am I sharing this today?

To get you to think of talent as a real investment – not a short range transaction. Consider putting together a Sales Operation Planning process around talent and get serious and intentional about finally getting ahead of the game in your talent pipeline. If you have not figured it out, this is only going to get worse for everyone as company tenures are shrinking, loyalty to companies is all but gone, and people are getting recruited out for bigger jobs, bigger titles, and bigger money. If your average turnover was 5% last year, expect it to rise. If you choose to do nothing, expect tough times in the future as you won’t have the talent you need when you need it. It’s time for leaders to step up and do something about talent instead of blaming others. This is a leadership problem to solve.

I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion.   You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on Leave a comment

Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on Leave a comment

Are You Having Fun?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Manufacturing Practice

Are you having fun?

I was thinking about work and how sometimes it’s tough to get motivated and other times it’s really easy. I have noticed that I have fun at work when my customers are happy about our service and vice versa. Here’s the thing: life is too short to work with jerks or people you don’t connect well with. One of my clients told me recently that she wants her people to have fun at work because they spend so much time there. I like that mentality a lot.

serviceI hope you are having fun working and, when you work with TYGES, it is something you look back on as a positive experience. If it is not positive, then let us know. And, if it is positive, then let us know that too.

I received this note a while back in an email from one of our candidates,

“I have worked with a few recruiters and must say that my experience with you and TYGES has been the best.”

Similar to the above I received this note recently from a candidate that we have in process,

“I am impressed with your preparation assistance.”

That’s fun to me.  I like the service aspect of what I do and it is a motivator for me.

Frankly, it is amazing to me how poorly many recruiters treat their candidates. I just do not understand it. At TYGES, our process is built around making sure that the customer experience is positive, both on the candidate and the client side. respectAs Recruiters, we have to set the tone with the client and the candidate for the relationship and it is in our nature to be impatient for results and answers, but we still need to treat people as we would want to be treated if the roles were reversed.

It’s always a good idea to reflect on your work and “why you work” from time to time. If you’re not having fun at work then maybe it’s time for a change. If you decide that a change is needed or you just want to explore options then call us. Send us your info or check out our list of job openings. I can’t promise we will be able to find you a new career opportunity but I can promise we will try to make the process a positive one.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on Leave a comment

Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on Leave a comment

Integrated Talent Chain – Part III

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

As a follow up to our series over the past couple of months, this is Part III (Part I, Part II)  in our series evaluating what it takes to put a true Integrated Talent Chain in place and make it a competitive weapon for your company.  Now that we have an understanding of current inventory and forecasted needs as well as turnover, let’s talk about what it takes to attract talent.

Question 1 – Do you have an Employment Brand?

What exactly does this mean? I boil it down to this one statement – it is why people come to work for your company and ultimately why they stay.  what is employee brandingThey may not stay forever but there is something that attracted them. A fancy brand, cool products, great giveaways, a specific location, the opportunities, the career pathing, the industry, etc. These are all examples of why people join companies and defining what is very unique about your company is important in defining who you are. A good place to start is a clear Mission that is meaningful and impactful to a person’s life. Talk about what you are trying to do as a company – your Vision. Make sure people understand your Core Values & Beliefs. From there you can then decipher the answer to your Employment Brand and learn how to share it appropriately. My warning to you is a cool product is not the answer; free coffee is not the answer; ping pong is not the answer – it is something much more impactful that stands the test of time. Yes it will be tweaked as time progresses but the core of who you are should not. This can be a very challenging exercise to go through as you have to get in touch with what is really the purpose of your business.

Question 2 – Do you have a clear Talent Acquisition Process?

You want to frustrate high potential talent, have an unclear, ever changing process with no repeatability and no speed. This is where most companies fail miserably. First their posture is to start from an arrogant perspective (my opinion) where they believe the talent will wait on them and they need to demonstrate their value to the company only when in reality when you are pursuing high potential talent it’s always a two way process. 1 way 2 wayHere’s my position on the process:

  • It should be well defined using standard work such that wherever a person interviews in the world they will have the same experience
  • Right up front – when you first speak to the individual, layout the process and make it very clear to them what they should expect as it pertains to steps & timeline. I can only think of one client in our lineup that I can honestly say does a good job of this. Most companies miss this mark.
  • As part of the process it needs to be swift and decisive. If the process is well documented up front, you can move people through the process at a good pace and make a decisive yes or no – if it’s a maybe it’s a no. I have heard the term “keep them warm” over a 100 times in my career – this is a joke. When I hear this I tell the individual to move on.
  • Don’t start the process unless you have preauthorization to hire someone. It’s a waste of time to get someone to the final stage of the interviews only to put them in a holding pattern while you run it up the presumable ladder for approval. This should be a foregone conclusion that you can hire this person. World class is the person leaves your building with an offer in hand. I’ve seen a lot of this 1 up process instilled over the years where the hiring manager is required to interview the person and weigh in on the decision. This is a failure as you are not fixing the process but rather inspecting every product.
  • If more than a few people have to interview the person like the boss’s boss as an example you have the wrong leader in the hiring capacity – replace them or replace yourself.
  • Don’t let perfection get in the way of getting better. There is no perfect person out there. Your focus should be on the journey at hand which is getting better daily.

Question 3 – Do you have the capacity to recruit & develop talent?

Recruiting good talent is difficult. It’s not about finding a resume online or a LinkedIn profile that’s looks good that makes it difficult. It’s a courting process just like it would be looking for a lifelong partner. It takes a lot work to source, call, qualify, recruit, attract and get the person on-boarded. When I hear an internal recruiter tell me they are personally working 20+ jobs at the same time, it’s a recipe for disaster. HelpIn my office, we estimate that a professional recruiter (working 50 hours/week) can work between 4-7 orders at any given time and actually have an impact. Especially given the amount of non-value added things that have been added to the process with applicant tracking systems, etc. I feel bad for most internal recruiters because of the unrealistic expectations put on them. If you’re going to get serious about recruiting you need to have the proper capacity with the proper tools and skills to be successful.

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? I’m talking about a formal Talent Development process in which I will discuss in Part 4.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback on anything. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.   You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on Leave a comment

8 Ways to Help a Recruiter Find a New Role for You

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

I often talk to candidates who have worked diligently to find a new role but have failed time and time again to find something suitable. Often, they have interviewed several times only to come in second. It amazes me that these same candidates expect a recruiter to able to wave his or her magic wand and get them in front of a dozen great companies who are hiring. choices3Let me be honest with you: I do not have a magic wand and I do not know any recruiter who has one either. I do know that finding a new role is tough and is made even more so by those who will not help themselves.

Having said this, I have some ideas for those who work with recruiters that will maximize the value you receive from that relationship.

  1. Treat the recruiter like the valuable resource they are. Be honest and open with them about what you want to do and where you want to go. Help them form a clear picture of what you want.
  2. Time kills all deals. Never waste the recruiter’s time by professing to have interest in a role when you really don’t. Make sure you do your due diligence and then pursue the role with all of your energy.
  3. No surprises. Be open with them about everything. This includes the good, the bad, and the ugly. Don’t set the recruiter up to fail by withholding information about why you left your previous job, etc.
  4. Follow the recruiter’s advice in all things related to the job search. Remember, this person makes a living finding people like you a job. When the recruiter tells you not to discuss something with the hiring authority, then don’t. If you are unclear on what you should or should not discuss, then ask.
  5. Get organized. Know what companies have been given your credentials in the past. Don’t set the recruiter up to give a company a resume that is already on file.
  6. Prep. Prep. Prep. When you go into an interview, you should know everything publicly available about the company and the role. Who are the decision makers? What are they looking for in a candidate? Why have others done poorly in interviews? Get all the information you can from the recruiter about these things so that you can prepare for them.
  7. Process is key. If you are unclear about the recruiter’s process or the company’s hiring process, then ask for clarification. Make sure you do what you say you are going to do when you said you would do it.
  8. Check in on a regular basis. Even if have not heard from the recruiter, you can certainly call or email once every week or so with an update. Nothing keeps your name on someone’s lips like regular communication.

So that’s it.

Help us to help you.

A recruiter can get you into an interview, but it’s up to you to get the call back by showing them what you’re made of when the time comes.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg

Posted on Leave a comment

Integrated Talent Chain – Part II

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO TYGES International

As I continue to talk to companies/clients and walk with them in their recruiting process, it is quite clear that there is a lack of an Integrated Talent Chain. Right now, I can’t tell if it is ignorance or just not a priority. I tend to think it’s a combination of both as while companies profess that people are their most valuable asset, that is not reflective in any part of the chain of events associated with recruitment, hiring, on-boarding, and retention of Talent. human capitalYes they put up fancy words like “Human Capital” and have their websites saying all the right things but the reality it is all surface with no depth.
Last month I wrote Integrated Talent Chain – Does it Exist?  Now I would like to take a deeper dive into ITC (Integrated Talent Chain), by answering the following:

• Understanding the current inventory of Talent in your organization?
• Understanding the forecasted needs in the next few years?
• Understanding the turnover (voluntary / involuntary)?

Translated in manufacturing speak:

• Current Inventory
• Sales Forecast
• Scrap

Companies pour so much energy in to most of their processes (purchasing, facilities, product development, marketing, manufacturing, etc.) and they spend a small fraction of their time understanding and planning their Human Capital. Yes companies do a decent job of managing headcounts that are used to produce products (direct labor) but where they normally fall down is measuring those on the indirect side. As we survey companies, most of the indirect side people management is reactive at best.

My question is why is this treated like “black magic” versus truly understanding your needs and filling your needs with the appropriate people?

An ITC that is tied to the business plan will give you what your needs are all the way down to a job description with responsibilities and expectations that you can hold the individual accountable. So back to the question – why is this not more methodical and calculable versus reactive? My supposition is companies don’t take it serious and still believe that they can recruit/hire whoever they want and whenever they want. I also think that most companies see this as an HR function primarily which is completely wrong. This should be in the top 3 priorities of the CEO and he/she needs to own it – period – no excuses. Top Down

Stop delegating ITC to everyone else in the company – own it, walk it, lead it. Yes you will need the help of your team but unless you own it, it will never be fully realized.
Where to start? Why not start with the basics

1. Take an inventory of your team (bottom to top); rate them – yes that means you have to make some subjective calls but anything is better than what you have now.
2. Look at your Business Plan over the next 3 years. Walk it down in the organization to understand the impact of the growth/decline planned for the business. Take this to the individual role level. Be Intentional.
3. Determine what your turnover is (guess if you have too initially).

With these 3 components you can create a mathematical model that will identify your gaps; Once you have this current state completed, you will need to maintain it like your checkbook – regularly. ITCNow you can begin to proactively shift your ITC on the recruiting side and figure out how to develop your existing staff to either coach them in or coach them out. Sounds easy right? No – because it is a painful exercise initially to set up but also to maintain and revisit monthly. If your too big to do it all at once, focus on the top 2 or 3 levels and get the process down and then add another level down every few months until you have full coverage. Along the way, there will be naysayers that don’t see the importance of the ITC but stick to it.

This is not “sexy”. You are not taking a cool new product to market; developing a new product or installing a new manufacturing line but this is the lifeline that will either grow your company or kill your company.

I welcome your feedback.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack2.jpg

 

Posted on Leave a comment

The Maze

Written by:  Kraig Ware, VP of Operations

Recently my oldest son brought home one of his writing projects from middle school called “The Maze.”  It is a fictional story that he wrote about a family that was going on a dream vacation.  Along the way, a choice had to be made…a critical choice.  More than a creative story, the “choice” made towards the end of the journey is simply incredible.  I hope you see the value/consequence of the choices we all make through the eyes of this young man.  Enjoy…

__________________________

THE MAZE

by: Shelton Ware (unedited)

Once there was a family taking a trip to the country for what they thought would be their dream vacation. They were driving down the old dilapidated country road and noticed they were low on fuel. They found an old gas station and walked in to pay for the gas.Gas station3  There was no one in the store, just a sign that said, “I’ll be back in an hour”.  So the family looked around on the maps for another gas station, but the nearest one was more than an hour away and would not be able to make it.  So they would have to wait.

Another eerie sign all around the store said “beware of blur”.

They thought it was just something fake and put it out of their minds.
Maze2Across the street there was a corn maze it looked very odd but the family did not think much of it. The family thought it would be something fun to do while they wait.  The instant the family entered the corn maze chills ran down their backs.

They dismissed it as wind and continued on through the maze.  Then they heard footsteps in the corn and they knew it was not them walking because they were frozen in fear. All the sudden a black thing as it was indescribably fast it was like a blur. No one could see for a couple of seconds. Then when their vision was returned the mother was gone, nowhere to be seen. Then the Dad and the boy heard a scream in the distance. Then the family realized this was far worse than the dream vacation they all thought they were going on. The boy and the father immediately started sprinting for their lives. For hours on hours they were searching desperately for the entrance but it was nowhere to be found. At last they found the entrance out of the maze. Once they got to the exit the dad made it out but at the last second the corn shot across like a curtain making a wall trapping the boy inside. The boy had no idea what to do he tried shouting for help but there was no answer to be heard. The boy had no choice to wander the maze looking for another way out.

The sun was starting to set and the evening chills were wandering through the air. maze4The maze almost seemed endless to the boy. It was like it was evolving and moving as time passed. After hours of searching for a way out the boy was tired. He had to rest somewhere.  He decided to lay down in a corner where the boy thought nothing could find him.

He woke up the sun is eyes but he felt something creep across his arm he looked at it and saw corn husks slowly wrapping around his arm and other parts of his limbs. He tried to free himself but he was to weak.  He could not move at all. The corn then started to pull him into the dark rich soil.  Everything was dark nothing to be heard or seen. He awoke in a small dark room with one old dim light hanging from the center. The boy was thinking trying to remember anything he could to figure out what was going on.

Then he remembered that on the signs stating “beware of blur” there was always black smudges.  They were on the maze sign, on the corn that trapped him in, and on the corn that pulled him to this room. He realized this is the blur, the blur was what took his mom, trapped him, and what brought him here. This is the blur’s maze and it has been manipulating it and everything that ever dared to enter.

The boy got out of the chair he was in and inspected the roomaze5m. He noticed there was a small door in front of him that he didn’t seem to notice before. He cautiously opened the door to find an open field with his mom and dad standing in the middle.  He walked toward them and progressed to a sprint.  When he reached them he was shocked to find that they were gone.  Then another humanoid figure was standing almost hovering in front of him.  He reached out and felt it. He heard a faint voice say,

“Here you are, you have passed all my tests now…here before you stands the final
test.”

The blur vanished. He looked up and saw his parents again standing apart from another. Choices2.jpg They had ropes around them.  He heard the voice again say “choose”.  The boy realized he had to choose one of his parents.  He thought he could never choose one parent over another.  He would have to live with the grief that he killed one of his parents forever. Thoughts started racing through his head about his parents and what they have done for him. He couldn’t pick he just couldn’t.

The thought of grief kept cycling through his head.  Then he realized something he could pick his own life instead of theirs.  He thought he had to do this, he could not pick between his parents.  He yelled out,

“I will pick myself!”

The blur replied “if you wish” instantly everything was black, it was the same feeling as when he was put into the room.  He heard another voice say “congratulations you have passed.”  The boy was stunned. He remembered every thing was a test and maybe this was the right choice. The voice again said “by choosing yourself to save two was very honorable, every other person I have tested did not choose themselves and then I banished them to the Maze forever.  You have passed so you and your family are free I will return you home”.  Again everything was black the same feeling as before.  He awoke in front of the maze with his family.  There was their car, the worker was back at the gas station.  They filled up and continued on their dream vacation. But the thought of the blur lingered in their minds forever…

THE END

__________________________

 

In business and in our life, sometimes it feels as if we are in a maze.  Perhaps a clear direction isn’t on your current horizon and you must make a choice to go right, left, turn around, or just keep going straight ahead.  Regardless of our current location or your desired destination, we will all have to make choices along the way.  Those choices will of course effect you and in turn they will also effect those around you.  At TYGES ,we understand the value of of making the right decision.  Sometimes that choice is not the easiest thing to do; yet, it is simply the right thing to do.

I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. You can also follow me at twitter @SKraigWare as I focus on striving for excellence within the business world and within our personal lives. Learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack2.jpg

Posted on Leave a comment

Never Stop Learning

Written by:  Carol Zimmerman, Director of Health Care

There’s a syndicated radio show I listen to in the mornings that, for the last couple of weeks, has been having a “Generation X versus Millennials” contest each morning. The Generation X-er (of which I am firmly in the camp) must answer current event and pop culture questions, while the Millennial has to answer trivia from Generation X’s heyday. It’s amazing to me how knowledge moves forward and we lose information that was once so common. Today’s Millennial didn’t know what the letters VCR meant. VCRAnd I’m sure I don’t know who won an MTV award this year.

Career-wise, it’s imperative that you stay on top of your game. But there’s more to it than that. Sure, you’ve attended conferences and know the latest methods, ideology, and trends. But do you know what events may be affecting your clients and customers? Do you know how to interview in an era where putting on your best attire and showing up 15 minutes early just isn’t necessarily how it’s done these days? Do you know how to produce a quality resume and then get it out there? This Gen-X’er recently had to coach a Millennial on how to forward me their resume from their computer.

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” – Mahatma Gandhi

learningMake sure you are taking time to learn new things every day! Read current news or a paperback novel. Look up a place on Google that you’ve never been to and probably never will. But learn just a little something about it. View it on Google Earth. At your favorite restaurant, take time to look up that menu item that you’ve never heard of (tzatziki anyone?). Study up on that latest new electronic gadget, even if you know you will never have a use for it. What does it do? What might it be used for and by whom?

One of my favorite people ever was a highly intelligent international businessperson who never lost his childlike wonder at new gadgets and technology. He wanted to learn it all and was delighted by it all.

Make today the day you start learning something new. Then repeat – every day. We’re never too old and in today’s information and technology age, it has never been easier. You never know when just little tidbits of information will become useful to you in your career.  I encourage your feedback and would like to connect with you on LinkedIn.  You can learn more about me HERE also you can follow me on twitter @CarolZTI as I focus on helping people just like you maximize their career. Learn more about TYGES on our website, on Twitter @TYGESINT, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg