Posted on Leave a comment

What is your Why?

When you wake up each day, “Why” do you do what you do?  Perhaps you are retired, in the middle of your career, or a student.  No matter where you are in your life, we all have to accomplish things throughout our day.  So ask yourself:

“Why” do you do what you do?

The answer to this question is vital, as it is the “key” to your motivation to make those things around you better for everyone.  Yes, even getting your best grade on a term paper is making the world a better place and preparing you to do your part to make that happen.  Each year, TYGES International gives back to those around us in our community and world.  Sure, finding solution’s for our clients is what we do well; however, helping organizations like 3e Resoration is one of our “whys” that fuels our passions to do what we do everyday.

3e-4The 3e Restoration Process© is an inclusive, highly relational and holistic approach guided by a flexible and replicable framework that utilizes an adaptable written curriculum to encourage, equip and empower “Friends/Families in Need” toward systemic change to break the cycle of extreme poverty and homelessness through healthy relational community and God’s sufficiency. Gracious hospitality, relentless hope, compassion, listening, justice, love and friendship are the seven core values that shape all we do and guide us as we address the Five Fold Reality of Poverty and Brokenness™.  WATCH to learn more about 3e Restoration.

Organizations like 3e Restoration cannot exist without volunteers, people just like you.  Tammy Hardin, one such volunteer for 3e, was featured in a compelling news article.  CLICK HERE to Read her story.  Like, Tammy, we all have passions.  Hopefully you have discovered and embraced yours.  When your passions are embraced, your daily activities (no matter what they are) will be energized not by what you do; yet, “Why” you do what you do.

At TYGES, we help our clients every day by finding key performers to achieve their objectives within the world of Industrial Manufacturing, AeroSpace, Defense, and Health Care. That’s what we do.  Every time we have a successful placement with one of our clients, we donate $100 to 3e Restoration.  That’s “Why” we do what we do.

You can learn more about TYGES on our website www.tyges.com and stay connected with the latest industry news and resources through TYGES International’s LinkedIn group page, on Twitter, and here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

 

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Chief Talent Officer?

Written by:  Tim Saumier, CEO

Back in May I introduced something called the Integrated Talent Chain (ITC) and have written about different aspects of it through a five part series (Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV) over the past few months. This final commentary on the ITC is centered upon the true process owner. Something I like to call the Chief Talent Officer. Taking you back a month ago: I was putting the final touch-up of part four when a client reached out requesting our assistance in recruiting a VP of Human Resources. The irony of this is they wanted to hire a non-traditional HR professional to be the right hand of one of their divisional president’s. They got to this place after admitting they had a misstep in the previous hire.trip The reality was they hired a traditional HR professional expecting them to do something they were not trained or wired to complete. They hired what most of us would expect in an HR professional while the competencies/expectations of the new hire were quite different. They needed someone who will provide a much greater focus on the overall business. Someone who will bring true strategic input and execution as well as process orientation. They ultimately want someone that has owned a P&L and can be the bridge between the strategy and the people who execute the strategy. This is a good first step to moving towards hiring the ITC process owner.

I’ve had a few people tell me that I’m bashing HR professionals. That is not my intent. I do believe there are some wonderful HR professionals out there but what I’m describing is not an HR role but rather a new type of role – Chief Talent Officer (CTO) who owns the entire process and is the ultimate “poster child” when it comes to representing the employment brand both to existing associates as well as those you are recruiting. They are outgoing, gregarious, and have a true understanding of the business and the impact that an engaged associate, or for that matter a disengaged associate, can have on the business. Most HR professionals I know are good at administering policy versus capturing the hearts of people that lead to business results and associate satisfaction.

We as a society have tried to turn these people in to something they have not been trained to do.

Does it mean they can never change? I’m not saying that but what I am saying is that it is difficult. One thing I would recommend is that if you have a solid HR professional who has potential, give them a line role and let them prove it as well as learn some things. This is way outside of most leaders comfort zones but this is how you put up or shut up. The new role will provide the person with a different set of lenses to see the world through.

Over the next few years, you will see this CTO role break out and become one of the most important roles in the organization and I believe will make or break a company as the talent pool continues to shrink. Who are these people and where do they come from? highpotIdeally they come from inside the company. They are a high-potential who is greatly respected, has an outstanding attitude and the type of person you not only enjoy being around but they get things done. I know what some of you are thinking – I know this person and we can’t afford to pull them out of their current role. You can’t afford not to pull them out of their role in my opinion. I’ve heard for the past decade that “people are our most important asset.” Well here’s the time to show it with more than words. Take your best athlete and put them in this role and watch them flourish and watch your company change for the better. Do you want a “competitive weapon” – this is it.

This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain. I’d love to hear your feedback – good and bad. I’m not sure what I’ll be talking about next month just yet but I’m sure it will build out from the ITC.

You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on Leave a comment

Are You Having Fun?

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Manufacturing Practice

Are you having fun?

I was thinking about work and how sometimes it’s tough to get motivated and other times it’s really easy. I have noticed that I have fun at work when my customers are happy about our service and vice versa. Here’s the thing: life is too short to work with jerks or people you don’t connect well with. One of my clients told me recently that she wants her people to have fun at work because they spend so much time there. I like that mentality a lot.

serviceI hope you are having fun working and, when you work with TYGES, it is something you look back on as a positive experience. If it is not positive, then let us know. And, if it is positive, then let us know that too.

I received this note a while back in an email from one of our candidates,

“I have worked with a few recruiters and must say that my experience with you and TYGES has been the best.”

Similar to the above I received this note recently from a candidate that we have in process,

“I am impressed with your preparation assistance.”

That’s fun to me.  I like the service aspect of what I do and it is a motivator for me.

Frankly, it is amazing to me how poorly many recruiters treat their candidates. I just do not understand it. At TYGES, our process is built around making sure that the customer experience is positive, both on the candidate and the client side. respectAs Recruiters, we have to set the tone with the client and the candidate for the relationship and it is in our nature to be impatient for results and answers, but we still need to treat people as we would want to be treated if the roles were reversed.

It’s always a good idea to reflect on your work and “why you work” from time to time. If you’re not having fun at work then maybe it’s time for a change. If you decide that a change is needed or you just want to explore options then call us. Send us your info or check out our list of job openings. I can’t promise we will be able to find you a new career opportunity but I can promise we will try to make the process a positive one.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

stack-logo-png

Posted on Leave a comment

Built A Great Team – Now What?

Written by: Tim Saumier, CEO

Now you’ve spent all this time, effort, money, etc. to get this talent aboard what are you going to do to keep them? Moving on to Part 4 (Read Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3) of this multi-part conversation as it relates to the “Integrated Talent Chain” (ITC), I want to focus on what happens after you’ve secured the talent and what you need to have in place to develop this talent that you’ve worked so hard for.  I’m talking about a formal Talent Development (TD) process. developmentSome companies do a decent job but most companies do not, which I think is more related to ignorance than the desire to not do it. It’s amazing the effort and money companies spend on recruiting and onboarding but they fail to see the real cost of losing someone due to the lack of development. You may argue that this needs to be organic. I won’t disagree but we need to have a standard process to help guide this process.

First – what is a formal TD process? One man’s opinion (mine). It’s what we do to not only retain but also make our employees better under our watch. Ideally we’d like to develop all employees but not all employees want it or deserve it. Hence the reason why we have to select the top 20% and pour our energy in to them. This 20% will deliver 80% of the results you are looking for ultimately (pareto principle). pareto-principleThese people provide a higher return and expect and deserve the attention of the company. The company has to do their part and take care of them and develop them. These high-potentials are treated differently on purpose – they are given a lot more freedom, are given first crack at stretch jobs (internal mobility), mentors / coaches, c suite visibility, training & development, invitations to top leadership meetings, leadership training, advanced educational courses, long term equity, and even higher raises (versus the typical merit raise). The challenge is keeping the egos in check. Sometimes a high-potential needs to leave your company. If they do, let them go gracefully and wish them well.

While this concept of having a process with specific touch points may seem like an abstract concept, it is something that can be developed in to a structured process where leadership can be wrapped around the process to drive its execution. Herein is the rub though:

Most managers don’t take this serious and nor do they want to do this.

Massive mistake and if you have people in your organization who don’t want to do this they should be removed from leadership. If they are not showing specific and measurable results in the area of developing talent, they should be removed. building-leadersI would go so far as to tie part of their income to their ability to achieve “people” metrics….this could include # of people promoted, # of people who they lateral out to another group, # of people who resigned (negative), etc. Don’t misunderstand me, these people need to be trained on how to be a leader and given the tools & processes before they can be held accountable. Most people put in leadership roles are not ready. We need to help them get ready.

So how do we get TD going? Start by mapping the process. Use a cross-functional team that incorporates your target audience (high-potentials). Yes they will come up with some ridiculous things but keep an open mind. Once you have the process, do a gap analysis on what’s lacking, of which you will find it will not only be process but it will be leaders and KPI’s. From their put a CTO (Chief Talent Officer) in place to own and drive the process. This is not an HR professional! I want to continue on this subject but I will hold out until next month to talk about this area.

Before I go, I will leave you with this. I thought the timing was perfect: I find it extremely interesting that a long-time client of mine reached out to us to start to work on hiring a non-traditional HR Leader for their global business where they are focused on being a true strategic business partner that can not only understand the business but also truly drive the business. change21They shared with me that they’d prefer a person who has run a business and wants to move in to HR and bring that level of business acumen to this typical administrative function. They went so far as to say they would consider someone who has never been in HR because they have a solid #2 in HR who can handle the administrative side of HR. Sounds pretty forward thinking to me and directionally what I’ll be talking about as it pertains to a true CTO.

Again, I welcome your thoughts and feedback. This is one man’s opinion on the Integrated Talent Chain.  You can find me on LinkedIn and at Twitter you can find me at @timsaumierTI.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter @TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

cropped-hr_tyges_stack11.jpg