8 Ways to Help a Recruiter Find a New Role for You

Written by:  Steve Sanders, VPGM Industrial Practice

I often talk to candidates who have worked diligently to find a new role but have failed time and time again to find something suitable. Often, they have interviewed several times only to come in second. It amazes me that these same candidates expect a recruiter to able to wave his or her magic wand and get them in front of a dozen great companies who are hiring. choices3Let me be honest with you: I do not have a magic wand and I do not know any recruiter who has one either. I do know that finding a new role is tough and is made even more so by those who will not help themselves.

Having said this, I have some ideas for those who work with recruiters that will maximize the value you receive from that relationship.

  1. Treat the recruiter like the valuable resource they are. Be honest and open with them about what you want to do and where you want to go. Help them form a clear picture of what you want.
  2. Time kills all deals. Never waste the recruiter’s time by professing to have interest in a role when you really don’t. Make sure you do your due diligence and then pursue the role with all of your energy.
  3. No surprises. Be open with them about everything. This includes the good, the bad, and the ugly. Don’t set the recruiter up to fail by withholding information about why you left your previous job, etc.
  4. Follow the recruiter’s advice in all things related to the job search. Remember, this person makes a living finding people like you a job. When the recruiter tells you not to discuss something with the hiring authority, then don’t. If you are unclear on what you should or should not discuss, then ask.
  5. Get organized. Know what companies have been given your credentials in the past. Don’t set the recruiter up to give a company a resume that is already on file.
  6. Prep. Prep. Prep. When you go into an interview, you should know everything publicly available about the company and the role. Who are the decision makers? What are they looking for in a candidate? Why have others done poorly in interviews? Get all the information you can from the recruiter about these things so that you can prepare for them.
  7. Process is key. If you are unclear about the recruiter’s process or the company’s hiring process, then ask for clarification. Make sure you do what you say you are going to do when you said you would do it.
  8. Check in on a regular basis. Even if have not heard from the recruiter, you can certainly call or email once every week or so with an update. Nothing keeps your name on someone’s lips like regular communication.

So that’s it.

Help us to help you.

A recruiter can get you into an interview, but it’s up to you to get the call back by showing them what you’re made of when the time comes.

I welcome your feedback, as well as, any questions/concerns that you may have about your career’s trajectory.  I would enjoy helping you as a Career Coach; who knows, perhaps our combined insight will unlock something better for you and your family.  You can find me on LinkedIn.  Also, you can learn more about TYGES at www.TYGES.com, on Twitter@TYGESInt, or here on our blog.

Our Mission is simple:

We’re here to make good things happen to other people.

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